Summary

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework 2017 report for the Australian Capital Territory finds areas of improvement and areas of concern in the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in the Australian Capital Territory.

Areas of improvement for the Australian Capital Territory include:

  • A significant increase in Indigenous-specific health assessments, from 34 per 1,000 in 2006–07 to 221 per 1,000 in 2015–16 (Table 3.04.3).
  • The immunisation coverage rate was slightly higher for Indigenous children than for other children by age 5, 94.1% compared with 93.4% as at 31 December 2015 (Table 3.02.4).
  • The gap in literacy and numeracy attainment between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Year 9 students in the Australian Capital Territory was smaller than at the national level in 2016 (tables 2.04.1, 2.04.3, 2.04.5, 2.04.7, 2.04.9).
  • The proportion of Indigenous children aged 4–14 undertaking at least 60 minutes of physical activity increased from 59% in 2008 to 65% in 2014–15 (Table 2.18.3).

Areas of concern for the Australian Capital Territory include:

  • Indigenous Australians had a higher age-standardised rate of hospitalisation for injury and poisoning compared with non-Indigenous Australians (29 compared with 22 per 1,000) in July 2013 to June 2015 (Table 1.03.3).
  • The age-standardised rate of hospitalisation for a principal diagnosis related to alcohol use for Indigenous Australians was 3.5 times the rate for non-Indigenous Australians (7.1 compared with 2.0 per 1,000, in July 2013 to June 2015) (Table 2.16.15).
  • Indigenous Australians had a lower age-standardised rate of hospitalisation where procedures were recorded, compared with non-Indigenous Australians (68% compared with 78%) in July 2013 to June 2015 (Table 3.06.1).
  • The proportion of Indigenous households living in dwellings of an unacceptable standard increased over time, from 8.4% in 2008 to 17% in 2014–15 (Table 2.02.6).
  • The employment rates for people aged 15–64 continued to be lower for Indigenous Australians than for non-Indigenous Australians in 2014–15 (63% compared with 77%) (Table 2.07.5).
  • A higher proportion of Indigenous Australians aged 15 and over reported being a victim of physical or threatened violence (20%) compared with non-Indigenous Australians (8%) in 2014–15 (Table 2.10.25).
  • The rate of Indigenous Australians aged 18 and over reporting high levels of psychological stress increased over time, from 21% in 2004–05 to 32% in 2014–15 (Table 1.18.36).
  • The age-standardised rate of disability or restrictive long-term health condition was almost twice as high for Indigenous Australians as for non-Indigenous Australians, 48% compared with 26% in 2014–15 (Table 1.14.1).
  • For Indigenous females, the age-standardised hospitalisation rate for self-harm was 2.6 times the rate for non-Indigenous females, 4.0 per 1,000 compared with 1.5 per 1,000 in July 2013 to June 2015 (Table 1.18.28).