2.15 Tobacco use

This measure reports on the smoking status for Indigenous Australians.

Why is it important?

This measure reports on the proportion of Indigenous Australians who smoke daily, at least once a week and less than weekly. The health impact of smoking is evident in the high rates of hospitalisation and deaths from tobacco‑related conditions (for example, chronic lung disease, cardiovascular disease and many forms of cancer) (Marley et al. 2014;
Pircher et al. 2012). Maternal smoking during pregnancy increases the risk of poor outcomes for babies and children. Second‑hand smoke also has adverse health effects for those exposed to it (AHMAC 2017).

Related measures

Data sources

  • National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey
  • Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey
  • National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey
  • National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Survey
  • National Health Survey
  • National Key Performance Indicators for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care

References

  • Marley JV, Atkinson D, Kitaura T, Nelson C, Gary D, Metcalf S et al. 2014. The be our ally beat smoking (BOABS) study, a randomised controlled trial of an intensive smoking cessation intervention in a remote Aboriginal Australian health care setting. BMC Public Health 14:32.
  • Pircher SLM, Li SQ & Guthridge SL 2012. Trend analysis of hospital admissions attributable to tobacco smoking, Northern Territory Aboriginal and non‑Aboriginal populations, 1998 to 2009. BMC Public Health 12:545.
  • AHMAC 2017. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework 2017 report. Canberra: AHMAC.