3.19 Accreditation

This measure reports on the proportion of accredited public hospitals and accredited general medical practices.

Why is it important?

This measure reports on the proportion of accredited public hospitals and accredited general medical practices. Accreditation is a process (usually voluntary) through which a recognised external body assesses the extent to which a health‑care organisation meets applicable quality standards. Quality standards typically consider issues such as: governance of the organisation, management of safety issues such as infection control, handling of care processes such as discharge planning, general management issues such as human resource management, quality of the physical infrastructure, and issues such as handling of patient complaints (AHMAC 2017). Public and private hospitals are accredited against the National Safety and Quality Health Service Standards. Accreditation in general practice involves assessment against standards set by the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners. There are 2 registered general practice accreditation providers: Australian General Practice Accreditation Limited (AGPAL) and General Practice Accreditation Plus (GPA+) (AHMAC 2017).

Data sources

  • Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care
  • Australian General Practice Accreditation Limited
  • General Practice Accreditation Plus
  • National Hospital Morbidity Database
  • National Public Hospitals Establishment Database
  • Online Services Report Data Collection

References

  • AHMAC 2017. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework 2017 report. Canberra: AHMAC.