Services accessed by users with a psychiatric disability

The disability support services accessed by people with a psychiatric disability may be either Residential support services or Non-residential support services, or both, depending on availability and their individual needs. Non-residential services are provided either by State or territory administered services or Australian Government-funded services . Residential services are provided by state or territory administered services.

Non-residential support services include Accommodation support , Community support, Community access , Respite services, and Employment services.

Residential Service types include Large residential facilities/institutions , Small residential facilities/institutions, Hostels and Group homes.

Non-residential services are provided at a much higher rate than residential services. In 2016–17, there were 411.9 users per 100,000 population with a psychiatric disability who accessed non-residential services whilst 14.2 users per 100,000 accessed residential services (Figure DIS.4). South Australia had the highest rates of both non-residential and residential service usage (535.1 and 32.3 per 100,000, respectively).

 

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Figure DIS.4 Alternative text - Source data: Psychiatric disability support services 2016–17 Table DIS.1 (780KB XLS).

Non-residential disability support services

Over the 5 years to 2016–17, the rate of non-residential service users with a psychiatric disability increased on average by 3.0% annually, from 365.6 users per 100,000 population in 2012–13 to 411.9 in 2016–17 (Figure DIS.5).

 

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Figure DIS.5 Alternative text -Source data: Psychiatric disability support services 2016–17 Table DIS.1 (780KB XLS).

Service users with a psychiatric disability accessed Employment services at a higher rate than other non-residential services, nationally in 2016–17. South Australia had the highest rate at 444.7 users per 100,000 population who accessed Employment services. Other non-residential services accessed were Community support (68.0 users per 100,000 nationally), Community access (24.8 nationally), Accommodation support, (18.5 nationally) and Respite services (16.4 nationally). Victoria had the highest rate of Respite service usage (42.3 users per 100,000 population).

Residential disability support services

Over the 5 years to 2016–17, the rate of residential service users with a psychiatric disability has decreased by an average of 3.3% annually, from 16.2 users per 100,000 population in 2012–13 to 14.2 in 2016–17 (Figure DIS.5).

Nationally, Group homes were the most common residential service type for users with a psychiatric disability (12.0 service users per 100,000 population). Group homes were the only residential service type reported for people with a psychiatric disability in the Northern Territory.

Client characteristics

For clients with a psychiatric disability using non-residential services (100,438), almost 2 in 3 (64,390 or 64.1%) had a primary psychiatric disability. The most frequently reported primary disability for residential service users with a psychiatric disability (3,455) was intellectual disability (2,171 or 62.8%).

Non-residential service users

There were more male (52.9%) than female (47.1%) users with a psychiatric disability accessing non-residential disability support services in 2016–17. About two-thirds (63.7%) were aged 25–54 and 4 in 5 (81.0%) were born in Australia.

About 5.7% of non-residential service users with a psychiatric disability were Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. The rate was more than 1.9 times as high for Indigenous Australians than other Australians (765.0 users per 100,000 and 398.6, respectively).

About 81% of non-residential service users lived in a private residence, reported living alone (44.4%), living with others (34.2%), or living with family (21.5%). The most common source of income was a disability or other pension or benefit (87.8%); 8.3% of users reported paid employment as their main income source.

Residential service users

There were more male (58.4%) residential service users with a psychiatric disability than female (41.6%) in 2016–17. The majority of service users were aged 35–64 (70.3%) and born in Australia (93.4%).

About 4.6% of residential service users with a psychiatric disability in 2016–17 were Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. The rate was more than 1.5 times as high for Indigenous Australians than other Australians (21.3 and 14.0 users per 100,000 respectively).

Residential service users with a psychiatric disability were most commonly living with others (89.5%), in a domestic-scale supported living facility (51.4%), and receiving the disability support pension (95.5%) as their main source of income.