Reports

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National Drug Strategy Household Survey 2016: detailed findings 

This 2016 National Drug Strategy Household Survey report shows that: the decline in daily smoking slowed in 2016 but improvements were seen among people living in the lowest socioeconomic area; certain groups disproportionately experience drug-related risks and recent use of illicit drugs was particularly high for people who identified as homosexual or bisexual; just under 4 in 10 Australians either smoked daily, drank alcohol in ways that put them at risk of harm or used an illicit drug in the previous 12 months.

Alcohol and other drug treatment services in Australia 2015–16 

In 2015–16, about 796 alcohol and other drug treatment services provided just over 206,600 treatment episodes to an estimated 134,000 clients. The top 4 drugs that led clients to seek treatment were alcohol (32% of treatment episodes), cannabis (23%), amphetamines (23%), and heroin (6%). The proportion of episodes where clients were receiving treatment for amphetamines has continued to rise over the 5 years to 2015–16, from 12% of treatment episodes in 2011–12 to 23% in 2015–16. The median age of clients in AOD treatment services is rising, from 31 in 2006–07 to 33 in 2015–16.

National Drug Strategy Household Survey (NDSHS) 2016—key findings  

This web-based release presents a summary of the national findings from the 2016 National Drug Strategy Household Survey. The 2016 NDSHS show that younger people (aged under 30) were smoking less, drinking less and using fewer illicit drugs in 2016 than in 2001. However, for people in their 40s, 50s and 60s, there was little to no change in drug usage behaviours over this period but their use of some drugs has increased between 2013 and 2016.

National opioid pharmacotherapy statistics (NOPSAD) 2016 

On a snapshot day in 2016, almost 34,000 clients across 6 states received pharmacotherapy treatment for their opioid dependence at 2,011 dosing points. There were 1,472 authorised prescribers of opioid pharmacotherapy drugs.

Data for Victoria and the Australian Capital Territory were unavailable at the time of release.

National opioid pharmacotherapy statistics 2014 

On a snapshot day in 2014, over 48,000 clients received pharmacotherapy treatment for their opioid dependence at 2,432 dosing points around Australia. As in previous year, methadone was the most common pharmacotherapy drug, with around two-thirds (67%) of clients treated with this drug. There were 2,319 prescribers of opioid pharmacotherapy drugs, an increase of 15% from 2013.

National Drug Strategy Household Survey detailed report: 2013 

This 2013 National Drug Strategy Household Survey report shows that: - fewer Australians are smoking daily and are smoking less cigarettes; - fewer people are exceeding the lifetime risk and single occasion risk guidelines for alcohol use; - overall illicit drug use has remained stable but some drugs have declined and some have increased; - alcohol continues to be the drug of most concern to the community but an increasing number of people are concerned about meth/amphetamines.

National Opioid Pharmacotherapy Statistics 2013 

On a snapshot day in 2013, over 47,000 clients received pharmacotherapy treatment for their opioid dependence at 2,355 dosing points around Australia. As in previous years, methadone was the most common pharmacotherapy drug, with around two-thirds (68%) of clients treated with this drug. There were 2,025 prescribers of opioid pharmacotherapy drugs, an increase of 15% from 2012.

The mental health of prison entrants in Australia: 2010 

This bulletin reports on the mental health of prison entrants, based on data from the 2010 National Prisoner Health Census. In 2010: - Nearly one third of prison entrants reported that they had mental health issues (a rate 2.5 times higher than the general population) - 16% of prison entrants took medication for mental health issues - 3 in 4 prison entrants who were taking mental health medication also used illicit drugs during the previous 12 months

2010 National Drug Strategy Household Survey report 

This 2010 National Drug Strategy Household Survey report shows: positive and significant reductions since 2007 in daily tobacco smoking; mixed findings on alcohol consumption and risk; and a small overall rise in illicit drug use. In terms of attitudes to drugs, excessive alcohol use and tobacco smoking were nominated as the two most serious concerns to the community - and there were higher levels of support than previously for tobacco and alcohol harm reduction policies.

Reducing alcohol and other drug-related harm 

Rates of risky consumption of alcohol and other drugs among Indigenous Australians are generally twice those in the non-Indigenous population, and are both a consequence of - and contribute to - the gap in health and social well-being. This resource sheet discusses patterns of harmful use of alcohol and other drugs within Indigenous communities and evaluates the effectiveness of various intervention strategies. It outlines what works, what doesn't, and what further research is needed, regarding strategies concerning supply reduction, demand reduction, and harm reduction.