Reports

Latest reports

An interactive insight into overweight and obesity in Australia 

Overweight and obesity is a major public health issue and among the leading risk factors to ill-health in Australia. This web report provides interactive data displays on the prevalence of overweight and obesity, differences in the prevalence between certain population groups and what is happening over time.

The data displays draw on data from 2 AIHW reports: A picture of overweight and obesity in Australia and Overweight and obesity in Australia: a birth cohort analysis.

Overweight and obesity in Australia: a birth cohort analysis 

Adults in 2014–15 were significantly more likely to be obese than adults of the same age 20 years earlier at almost any given age. At age 18–21, 15.2% of those born in 1994–1997 were obese, almost double the proportion of those born in 1974–1977 at the same age (8.0%). Children and adolescents in 2014–15 were also significantly more likely to be overweight or obese at ages 10–13 and 14–17 than those of the same age 20 years earlier.

Additional overweight and obesity data are reported in 2 other AIHW products: A picture of overweight and obesity in Australia and An interactive insight into overweight and obesity in Australia.

A picture of overweight and obesity in Australia 

This report provides an overview of overweight and obesity in Australia—a major public health issue that has significant health and financial costs. Almost one-quarter of children and two-thirds of adults are overweight or obese, and rates continue to rise, largely due to a rise in obesity, which cost the economy $8.6 billion in 2011–12.

Additional overweight and obesity data are reported in 2 other AIHW products: Overweight and obesity in Australia: a birth cohort analysis and An interactive insight into overweight and obesity in Australia.

Risk factors to health 

Health risk factors are attributes, characteristics or exposures that increase the likelihood of a person developing a disease or health disorder. Behavioural risk factors are those that individuals have the most ability to modify. Biomedical risk factors are bodily states that are often influenced by behavioural risk factors.

Weight loss surgery in Australia 2014–15: Australian hospital statistics 

Weight loss surgery in Australia 2014–15: Australian hospital statistics is a new report in AIHW’s series of summary reports describing the characteristics of hospitals and hospital services in Australia. In 2014–15, there were about 22,700 hospital separations involving one or more weight loss surgery procedures. Seven in 8 of these separations occurred in private hospitals. Around 18,000 of weight loss surgery separations, or 79%, were for female patients. From 2005–06 to 2014–15, the total number of weight loss surgery separations more than doubled, from about 9,300 to 22,700.

Impact of overweight and obesity as a risk factor for chronic conditions 

This report updates and extends estimates of the burden due to overweight and obesity reported in the Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011 to include burden in people aged under 25, revised diseases linked to overweight and obesity based on the latest evidence, and estimates by socioeconomic group. The report includes scenario modelling, undertaken to assess the potential impact on future health burden if overweight and obesity in the population continues to rise or is reduced. The enhanced analysis in the report shows that 7.0% of the total health burden in Australia in 2011 is due to overweight and obesity, and that this burden increased with increasing level of socioeconomic disadvantage.

Obesity and workplace absenteeism among older Australians 

This bulletin examines the relationship, as far as Australia’s 2001 National Health Survey (NHS) allows, between obesity and absenteeism from work in almost 10,000 employed men and women who participated in that survey. It also assesses whether the results are consistent with the likelihood of having consulted a health professional and with self-assessed health status. The relationship between obesity and labour force status is also examined.

Health, wellbeing and body weight: characteristics of overweight and obesity in Australia, 2001 

Overweight, and in particular obesity, is known to be associated with numerous adverse health conditions. This bulletin, which complements other work produced by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare on overweight and obesity, investigates the relationship between this growing public health problem and a number of health-related characteristics using national estimates from the 2001 National Health Survey.

Are all Australians gaining weight?: differentials in overweight and obesity among adults, 1989-90 to 2001 

This bulletin presents the results of analyses of the prevalence of overweight and obesity for a range of different subgroups of Australian adults over the period 1989-90 to 2001. These comparisons between subgroups are referred to as differentials. The characteristics examined include basic demographic details (age and sex), place of residence, socioeconomic status, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status and ethnicity.

A growing problem: trends and patterns in overweight and obesity among adults in Australia, 1980 to 2001 

This bulletin documents the evidence from national cross-sectional surveys of overweight and obesity among adults in Australia during the past two decades, puts the size of the problem in perspective, and compares the prevalence in Australia with the prevalence in other developed countries. Future bulletins will focus on trends by socio-demographic and economic factors, and on the impact of overweight and obesity in Australia in terms of a number of health-related measures.