Maternal characteristics

This section looks at congenital anomalies by various maternal characteristics. In 2016, around 8,800 (3%) women giving birth had a baby with a congenital anomaly. Most (95%) of these women had a singleton birth; nearly three-quarters (73%) were aged 20–34 years and nearly three-quarters (73%) lived in Major cities. Around 5% of women giving birth to a baby with a congenital anomaly were Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander (respectfully hereafter referred to as Indigenous women).

Congenital anomaly rates were higher in babies born to:

  • women having a multiple birth (106 per 1,000 women giving birth), compared with those having a singleton birth (31 per 1,000 women giving birth)
  • women aged under 20 and those aged 40 years and over (41 and 43 per 1,000 women giving birth, respectively, compared with 32 per 1,000 women giving birth aged 20–39 years)
  • Indigenous women (46 per 1,000 women giving birth), compared with non-Indigenous women (32 per 1,000 women giving birth).

The following visualisation shows the number, proportion and rate of women giving birth to a baby with a congenital anomaly, by various maternal characteristics. These include maternal age at birth, the Indigenous status of women giving birth, parity (this indicates whether a woman has had a previous pregnancy), plurality (this indicates the number of births resulting from the pregnancy) and remoteness area of usual residence (where women live). The anomalies are grouped and can be filtered by body system (type of anomaly).

Number and rate of selected anomalies, by maternal characteristics,  2016

This data visualisation shows the number, proportion and rate of women giving birth to a baby with a congenital anomaly by various maternal characteristics. These include maternal age at birth, maternal Indigenous status, parity, plurality and remoteness area. Data can be filtered by body system. In 2016 around 8,800 (3%) women giving birth had a baby with an anomaly. Congenital anomaly rates were higher in women having a multiple birth (106 per 1,000 women giving birth) compared with those having a singleton birth (31 per 1,000 women giving birth).