Reports

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Cancer screening in Australia: participation data 

Cancer screening programs aim to reduce illness and death resulting from cancer through an organised approach to screening. These tables present the latest participation data for Australia’s three cancer screening programs: BreastScreen Australia, National Cervical Screening Program and National Bowel Cancer Screening Program.

National Bowel Cancer Screening Program: monitoring report 2017 

This report presents statistics on the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP) using key performance indicators. Of those who were invited to participate in the NBCSP between 1 January 2014 and 31 December 2015, 39% undertook screening. For those screened in 2015, 8% had a positive result warranting further assessment. One in 29 participants who underwent a follow-up diagnostic assessment was diagnosed with a confirmed or suspected cancer.

BreastScreen Australia monitoring report 2014–2015  

Around 54% of women in the target age group of 50–74 took part in BreastScreen Australia, with more than 1.7 million women screening in 2014–2015.
Breast cancer mortality has decreased since BreastScreen Australia began from 31 deaths per 100,000 women of all ages in 1991 to 20 deaths per 100,000 women of all ages in 2014.

National Cervical Screening Program Data Dictionary version 1.0 

The National Cervical Screening Program aims to reduce incidence, morbidity and mortality from cervical cancer in Australia. A new National Cervical Screening Program is scheduled to commence on 1 December 2017—this new National Cervical Screening Program data dictionary is a key document that has been developed by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare with the assistance of state and territory cervical screening programs and other cervical screening experts, to support monitoring and reporting by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare for the new National Cervical Screening Program.

Cervical screening in Australia 2014–2015 

Cervical screening in Australia 2014–2015 presents the latest national statistics monitoring the National Cervical Screening Program, which aims to reduce incidence, morbidity and mortality from cervical cancer. Just over half (56%) of women in the target age group of 20–69 took part in the program, with more than 3.8 million women screening in 2014 and 2015. Cervical cancer incidence for women of all ages remains at an historical low of 7 new cases per 100,000 women, and deaths are also low, historically and by international standards, at 2 deaths per 100,000 women.

Cancer screening in Australia by small geographic areas 

This dynamic data display report card provides a brief, at-a-glance view of the three national population-based screening programs—National Bowel Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP), BreastScreen Australia and National Cervical Screening Program (NCSP)—performance indicators by Primary Health Network (PHN) and Statistical Area Level 3 (SA3).

BreastScreen Australia monitoring report 2013–2014 

The BreastScreen Australia monitoring report 2013–2014 presents the latest national statistics monitoring BreastScreen Australia, which aims to reduce illness and death resulting from breast cancer through organised screening to detect cases of unsuspected breast cancer in women, thus enabling early intervention. Around 54% of women in the target age group of 50–69 took part in the program, with more than 1.4 million women screening in 2013–2014. Breast cancer mortality is at a historic low, at 42 deaths per 100,000 women.

National Bowel Cancer Screening Program: monitoring report 2016 

This report presents statistics on the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP). This monitoring report is the first to measure the NBCSP using NBCSP key performance indicators. Of those who were invited to participate in the NBCSP between 1 January 2013 and 31 December 2014, 37% undertook screening. For those screened in 2014, 7% had a positive result warranting further assessment. One in 32 participants who underwent a follow-up diagnostic assessment were diagnosed with a confirmed or suspected cancer.

Cervical screening in Australia 2013–2014 

Cervical screening in Australia 2013–2014 presents the latest national statistics monitoring the National Cervical Screening Program, which aims to reduce incidence, morbidity and mortality from cervical cancer. Around 57% of women in the target age group of 20–69 took part in the program, with more than 3.8 million women screening in 2013 and 2014. Cervical cancer incidence for women of all ages remains at an historical low of 7 new cases per 100,000 women, and deaths are also low, historically and by international standards, at 2 deaths per 100,000 women.

BreastScreen Australia monitoring report 2012–2013 

The BreastScreen Australia monitoring report 2012–2013 presents the latest national statistics in the monitoring of BreastScreen Australia, which aims to reduce illness and death resulting from breast cancer through organised screening to detect cases of unsuspected breast cancer in women, thus enabling early intervention.

National Bowel Cancer Screening Program: monitoring report 2013–14 

This report presents statistics on the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program for Australians invited to take part between July 2013 and June 2014. Thirty six per cent (about 510,000) of those who were invited went on to participate in screening, of whom 7.5% (37,700) were found to require further assessment. One out of every 11 assessments detected an advanced adenoma (pre-cancerous lesion), and a bowel cancer was detected in 1 out of every 25 assessments.

Cervical screening in Australia 2012–2013 

Cervical screening in Australia 2012–2013 presents the latest national statistics monitoring the National Cervical Screening Program, which aims to reduce incidence, morbidity and mortality from cervical cancer. Around 58% of women in the target age group of 20–69 took part in the program, with more than 3.8 million women screened in 2012 and 2013. Cervical cancer incidence for women of all ages remains at an historical low of 7 new cases per 100,000 women, and deaths are also low, historically and by international standards, at 2 deaths per 100,000 women.