Reports

Featured reports

Australian Burden of Disease Study: impact and causes of illness and death in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 2011 

This report provides estimates of the non-fatal and fatal burden of disease for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population as well as estimates of the gap in disease burden between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. The disease groups causing the most burden among Indigenous Australians in 2011 were mental and substance use disorders, injuries, cardiovascular diseases, cancer and respiratory diseases. Indigenous Australians experienced a burden of disease that was 2.3 times the rate of non-Indigenous Australians. Over one third of the overall disease burden experienced by Indigenous Australians could be prevented by removing exposure to risk factors such as tobacco and alcohol use, high body mass, physical inactivity and high blood pressure.

Indigenous eye health measures 2016 

This is the first national report on 22 newly developed Indigenous eye health measures. The measures cover the prevalence of eye health conditions, diagnosis and treatment services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians, the eye health workforce and outreach services. Subject to data availability, the report examines differences between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians, as well as differences by factors such as age, sex, remoteness, jurisdiction and Primary Health Network.

Indigenous health check (MBS 715) data tool 

All Indigenous people are eligible for an annual Indigenous-specific health check: item 715 on the Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS). This tool shows numbers and usage rates of the checks at national, state and territory and Primary Health Network levels. Charts can be customised to show different time periods and, where possible, disaggregations by age and sex. 

Trends in Indigenous mortality and life expectancy 2001–2015 

This report examines Indigenous mortality and life expectancy during the period 2001 to 2015, based on evidence from the Enhanced Mortality Database. The study observed increases in life expectancy during the study period for both Indigenous males and females across most jurisdictions. Life expectancy however increased faster among non-Indigenous than among Indigenous males and females. As a result, there was little change in the life expectancy gap.

Northern Territory Outreach Hearing Health Program: July 2012 to December 2016 

This report presents information on hearing health outreach services provided to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people in the Northern Territory. It shows that in 2016, 2,452 audiology, 1,020 ear, nose and throat teleotology and 1,156 Clinical Nurse Specialist services were provided. Of those children and young people who received treatment 51% had improved hearing loss and 62% had improved hearing impairment.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework 2017 report: Australian Capital Territory 

This report gives the latest information on how Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the Australian Capital Territory are faring according to various measures of health status and outcomes, determinants of health, and health system performance. Indicators are based on the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework. The report highlights the main areas of improvement, and continuing concern.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework 2017 report: Northern Territory 

This report gives the latest information on how Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the Northern Territory are faring according to various measures of health status and outcomes, determinants of health, and health system performance. Indicators are based on the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework. The report highlights the main areas of improvement, and continuing concern.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework 2017 report: New South Wales 

This report gives the latest information on how Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in New South Wales are faring according to various measures of health status and outcomes, determinants of health, and health system performance. Indicators are based on the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework. The report highlights the main areas of improvement, and continuing concern.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework 2017 report: Victoria 

This report gives the latest information on how Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Victoria are faring according to various measures of health status and outcomes, determinants of health, and health system performance. Indicators are based on the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework. The report highlights the main areas of improvement, and continuing concern.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework 2017 report: Queensland 

This report gives the latest information on how Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Queensland are faring according to various measures of health status and outcomes, determinants of health, and health system performance. Indicators are based on the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework. The report highlights the main areas of improvement, and continuing concern.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework 2017 report: South Australia 

This report gives the latest information on how Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in South Australia are faring according to various measures of health status and outcomes, determinants of health, and health system performance. Indicators are based on the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework. The report highlights the main areas of improvement, and continuing concern.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework 2017 report: Western Australia 

This report gives the latest information on how Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Western Australia are faring according to various measures of health status and outcomes, determinants of health, and health system performance. Indicators are based on the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework. The report highlights the main areas of improvement, and continuing concern.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health organisations: Online Services Report—key results 2015–16 

This is the eighth national report on organisations funded by the Australian Government to provide health services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. In 2015–16: 204 organisations provided primary health-care services to around 461,500 clients through 5.4 million client contacts and 3.9 million episodes of care; 216 counsellors from 93 organisations provided social and emotional wellbeing services to around 18,900 clients through 88,900 client contacts; 80 organisations provided substance-use services to around 32,700 clients through 170,400 episodes of care.

National Key Performance Indicators for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander primary health care: results from June 2016 

This fourth national report on the national Key Performance Indicators (nKPIs) data collection is based on data from more than 240 primary health care organisations that received funding from the Australian Government Department of Health to provide services primarily to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Information is presented for 22 ‘process-of-care’ and ‘health outcome’ indicators for June 2016, which focus on maternal and child health, preventative health, and chronic disease management. The report shows continuous improvements for the majority of indicators.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework 

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework provides the latest information on how Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia are faring according to a range of 68 performance measures across 3 tiers: health status and outcomes, determinants of health, and health system performance.

Northern Territory Remote Aboriginal Investment: Oral Health Program—July 2012 to December 2015 

This report presents analyses on oral health services provided to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and adolescents in the Northern Territory under the National Partnership Agreement on Northern Territory Remote Aboriginal Investment. From July 2012 to December 2015, there was generally an increase in the number of Indigenous children and adolescents who received full-mouth fluoride varnish applications, fissure sealant applications, and clinical services. A long-term analysis shows that the proportion of service recipients with experience of tooth decay decreased for most age groups between 2009 and 2015, with the greatest decrease—from 73% to 42%—seen in those aged 1–3.

Northern Territory Remote Aboriginal Investment: Ear and Hearing Health Program—July 2012 to June 2016 

This report presents data on the Indigenous children and young people who participated in the audiology, ear, nose and throat (ENT) teleotology and Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) services delivered under the National Partnership Agreement on Northern Territory Remote Aboriginal Investment. During 2012–16, 9,221 outreach audiology services were provided to 5,357 children and young people, and 3,799 ENT teleotology services to 2,434 children and young people. A total of 2,612 children participated in the CNS services and presented for 3,085 visits. Of the children and young people who received audiology services in 2015–16, 31% had a hearing impairment.

Specialist homelessness services 2015–16 

The specialist homelessness services 2015–16 web report is the fifth annual report from the Specialist Homelessness Services Collection (SHSC). It describes the characteristics of clients of specialist homelessness services, the services requested, outcomes achieved, and unmet requests for services during 2015–16.

Family violence prevention programs in Indigenous communities 

Family violence is a very serious and widespread issue in Australia. It has become an area of growing public concern, and is a priority area for Australian and state and territory governments. This resource sheet examines the extent of the problem, and explores some programs that have been trialled in Indigenous communities to reduce family violence. It also examines non-Indigenous-specific Australian and international programs. It identifies principles and components that contribute to successful programs, and highlights the need for well-designed program evaluations.