Reports

Featured reports

Australian Burden of Disease Study: impact and causes of illness and death in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 2011 

This report provides estimates of the non-fatal and fatal burden of disease for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population as well as estimates of the gap in disease burden between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. The disease groups causing the most burden among Indigenous Australians in 2011 were mental and substance use disorders, injuries, cardiovascular diseases, cancer and respiratory diseases. Indigenous Australians experienced a burden of disease that was 2.3 times the rate of non-Indigenous Australians. Over one third of the overall disease burden experienced by Indigenous Australians could be prevented by removing exposure to risk factors such as tobacco and alcohol use, high body mass, physical inactivity and high blood pressure.

Indigenous eye health measures 2017 

Indigenous eye health measures 2017 is an online presentation of the latest Indigenous eye health data. The report compiles data from a range of sources to provide a comprehensive picture of Indigenous eye health.

 

Latest reports

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health organisations: alcohol and other drug treatment services 

Information on the majority of Australian Government-funded Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander substance use services are available from the Online Services Report (OSR) data collection.

The most common substance-use issues reported by organisations providing substance-use services that reported to the OSR in 2016–17, in terms of staff time and organisational resources, were alcohol, cannabis and amphetamines.

In 2016–17, all of the 80 organisations reported alcohol as one of the most common substance-use issues and almost all (95%) reported cannabis.

Organisations reporting amphetamines as a common substance-use issue increased from 70% in 2014–15 to 79% in 2015–16, and slightly increased again to 80% in 2016–17.

Northern Territory Outreach Hearing Health Program: July 2012 to December 2017 

This report presents information on hearing health outreach services provided to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people in the Northern Territory. It shows that in 2017, 1,870 audiology, 876 ear, nose and throat teleotology and 876 Clinical Nurse Specialist services were provided. Among children and young people who received treatment, 55% had improved hearing loss and 65% had improved hearing impairment over subsequent visits.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework (HPF) report 

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework report provides the latest information on how Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia are faring according to a range of 68 performance measures across 3 tiers: health status and outcomes, determinants of health, and health system performance.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adolescent and youth health and wellbeing 2018 

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adolescent and youth health and wellbeing 2018 report provides comprehensive data on the health and wellbeing of Indigenous people aged 10–24. Information on health and wellbeing outcomes, health determinants, risk factors, and health and welfare service use for Indigenous youth are included. Data are disaggregated by age group, sex, state and territory and remoteness areas, as well as trend information. The report also examines differences between young Indigenous and non-Indigenous people on key health and wellbeing measures. 

National Key Performance Indicators for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander primary health care: results for 2017 

This fifth national report on the national Key Performance Indicators (nKPIs) data collection is based on data from 231 primary health care organisations that receive funding from the Australian Government Department of Health to provide services primarily to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Information is presented for December 2017, for 24 ‘process-of-care’ and ‘health outcome’ indicators, focusing on maternal and child health, preventative health, and chronic disease management. The report shows improvements for the majority of indicators between June and December 2017.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Stolen Generations aged 50 and over 

This report provides estimated numbers and demographic characteristics of the Stolen Generations survivors aged 50 and over in 2014–15. It presents data on a range of health and socioeconomic outcomes, and analysis of differences with an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander comparison group to examine the effects of removal from families. The findings will help to inform the needs for health, disability and housing services for the older Stolen Generations members.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Stolen Generations and descendants: numbers, demographic characteristics and selected outcomes 

This report provides estimated numbers and demographic characteristics of the Stolen Generations and descendants using a series of ABS surveys. It also presents a range of health and socioeconomic outcomes for the Stolen Generations and descendants, and differences with Indigenous and non-Indigenous comparison groups, to examine the effects of removal from families. The findings in the report will be useful to assess the needs of the Stolen Generations and their families.

Better Cardiac Care measures for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people: third national report 2017 

This is the third national report on the 21 Better Cardiac Care measures for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, with updated data available to report on 14 measures. It shows that while the mortality rate from cardiac conditions is falling among Indigenous Australians, it is still much higher than among non-Indigenous Australians. And while access to cardiac-related health services is improving the incidence and recurrent rates of acute rheumatic fever among Indigenous Australians continue to be much higher than in non-Indigenous Australians.

Closing the Gap targets: 2017 analysis of progress and key drivers of change 

This report provides detailed information and analyses on the Closing the Gap targets, including the key drivers of change underpinning these targets. This report provides context for policy debate and discussion for the Closing the Gap Refresh, a joint initiative of the Council of Australian Governments (COAG). Information on this COAG initiative, and additional resources with updated data on the COAG targets are available at the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet website.

Cancer in Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander people of Australia 

Cancer in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people of Australia presents the latest available information on national population screening programs, cancer incidence, survival, prevalence and mortality for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians, compared with non-Indigenous Australians. Information is available as data visualisations to explore by sex, age, state and territory, remoteness area and trend.

Family, domestic and sexual violence in Australia, 2018 

Family, domestic and sexual violence is a major health and welfare issue. It occurs across all ages, socioeconomic and demographic groups but mainly affects women and children. Indigenous women, young women and pregnant women are particularly at risk. This report explores the extent, impact and cost of family, domestic and sexual violence in Australia, and looks at what could be done to fill important data gaps.  

Northern Territory Remote Aboriginal Investment: Oral Health Programs, July 2012 to December 2016 

The Australian Government has been funding oral health services for Indigenous children in the Northern Territory since 2007. In 2016, 3,426 Indigenous children received clinical services, and preventive services such as full-mouth fluoride varnish applications were provided to 4,502 Indigenous children and fissure sealant services to 2,019 children. Tooth decay experience varied by age, with 90% of children aged 6 and 88% of 9-year olds having tooth decay. There have been improvements in the oral health of younger service recipients, with the average amount of tooth decay in children aged 1–3 decreasing by 19%, and an 11% decrease among 8 year olds between 2013 and 2016. 

Indigenous health check (MBS 715) data tool 

All Indigenous people are eligible for an annual Indigenous-specific health check: item 715 on the Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS). This tool shows numbers and usage rates of the checks at national, state and territory and Primary Health Network levels. Charts can be customised to show different time periods and, where possible, disaggregations by age and sex. 

Trends in Indigenous mortality and life expectancy 2001–2015 

This report examines Indigenous mortality and life expectancy during the period 2001 to 2015, based on evidence from the Enhanced Mortality Database. The study observed increases in life expectancy during the study period for both Indigenous males and females across most jurisdictions. Life expectancy however increased faster among non-Indigenous than among Indigenous males and females. As a result, there was little change in the life expectancy gap.