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Australia's welfare 2019: in brief 

Australia’s welfare 2019: in brief tells the story of welfare in Australia with key findings on housing, education and skills, employment and work, income and finance: government payments, social support, justice and safety, and Indigenous Australians.

Australia’s welfare 2019 is the 14th biennial welfare report of the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. This edition introduces a new format and expanded product suite:

Australia’s welfare 2019: data insights 

Australia’s welfare 2019: data insights presents an overview of the welfare data landscape and explores selected welfare topics—including intergenerational disadvantage, income support, future of work, disability services, elder abuse and child wellbeing—in 8 original articles.

Australia’s welfare 2019 is the 14th biennial welfare report of the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. This edition introduces a new format and expanded product suite:

Indigenous eye health measures 2018 

This is the third annual report on the Indigenous eye health measures. The measures cover the prevalence of eye health conditions, diagnosis and treatment services, the eye health workforce and outreach services. The report examines differences between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians, as well as differences by factors such as age, sex, remoteness, jurisdiction and lower level geographies. The report provides an evidence base for monitoring changes in Indigenous eye health over time, access to and use of eye health services, and for identifying gaps in service delivery.

Indigenous eye health measures 2018: in brief is a companion to this report.

Insights into vulnerabilities of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 50 and over—2019 

This report presents information on the complex and varied needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 50 and over. It brings together data from a range of sources to identify potential factors that may be associated with vulnerability to abuse. The report covers demographic characteristics, along with information on outcomes and service use related to aged care, health and functioning, social and emotional wellbeing, housing and homelessness, financial circumstances, alcohol and substance use, traumatic life events and safety.

Insights into vulnerabilities of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 50 and over—in brief is a companion to this report.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health organisations: Online Services Report — key results 2017–18 

This is the tenth national report on organisations funded by the Australian Government to provide health services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. In 2017–18, nearly 200 organisations provided a range of primary health services to around 483,000 clients, 81% of whom were Indigenous. Around 3.6 million episodes of care were provided, nearly 3.1 million of these (85%) by Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services.

National Key Performance Indicators for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care: Results to June 2018 

This is the first Tableau report using data from the national Key Performance Indicators (nKPIs) data collection. Information is presented for the reporting periods June 2017, December 2017 and June 2018 across 24 indicators, focusing on maternal and child health, preventative health, and chronic disease management. More than 270,000 Indigenous regular clients attended organisations that reported nKPI data in June 2018.

Regional variation in uptake of Indigenous health checks and in preventable hospitalisations and deaths 

Focusing on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, this report shows how rates of potentially preventable hospitalisations, potentially avoidable deaths and Indigenous health checks vary geographically within each Australian state and territory and between Primary Health Networks. Linear regression is used to identify areas that have unexpectedly high or low rates of potentially preventable hospitalisations given their characteristics.

Improving Indigenous identification in mortality estimates 

Measuring progress on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and welfare outcomes relies on consistent, complete, and reliable identification of Indigenous Australians in key data collections. 

Incomplete and inconsistent reporting of Indigenous identification occurs through a combination of Indigenous misclassification by data providers at the point of data collection, and Indigenous people choosing not to identify as Indigenous in certain circumstances.

This report provides an overview of AIHW work on improving Indigenous identification, particularly in enhancing mortality estimation through statistical data linkage.

Indigenous health checks and follow-ups 

Through Medicare (MBS item 715), Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people can receive Indigenous-specific health checks from their doctor, as well as referrals for Indigenous-specific follow-up services.

  • In 2017–18, 230,000 Indigenous Australians had one of these health checks (29%).
  • The proportion of Indigenous health check patients who had an Indigenous-specific follow-up service within 12 months of their check increased from 12% to 40% between 2010–11 and 2016–17.

Acute Rheumatic Fever and Rheumatic Heart Disease in Australia 

This report presents data from the National Rheumatic Heart Disease Data Collection, collated from the rheumatic heart disease registers in Queensland, Western Australia, South Australia and the Northern Territory.

ARF and RHD are preventable diseases affecting disadvantaged populations. This report shows that ARF rates increase with remoteness, and that rates are highest in Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Australians, females and in young people aged 5–14.

Children living in households with members of the Stolen Generations 

This report presents analyses of selected outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children who live in households with members of the Stolen Generations. It shows these children are more likely than comparable other Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children to experience a range of adverse outcomes. The report provides a new perspective on the intergenerational impact of the initial removal of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children from their families that led to the Stolen Generations.

Injury of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people due to transport, 2010–11 to 2014–15 

The age-standardised rate for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people was 2.7 times the rate for non-Indigenous Australians for fatal cases and 1.3 times the rate for non-Indigenous Australians for serious injuries. Age-standardised rates of fatal and serious land transport injury increased with the remoteness of the person’s usual residence, regardless of Indigenous status. Fatal and serious injury rates for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people did not change significantly. 

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people: a focus report on housing and homelessness 

This report examines the profiles of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in both the housing and homelessness sectors over time, using multiple data sources and visualisation tools.

Historically, Indigenous Australians have been over-represented among clients seeking homelessness and social housing services. This report shows that the housing situation of Indigenous Australians has improved—with rises in home ownership and housing provided through the private rental market, and falling levels of homelessness.