Australia's welfare 2015

  • Publication
  • Release Date: 20 Aug 2015
  • Author: AIHW
  • Media release
 

Australia's welfare 2015 is the AIHW’s 12th biennial report on the wellbeing of Australians. It examines a wide range of contemporary topics in a series of analytical feature articles and short statistical snapshots. The report also summaries the performance of the welfare system against a provisional set of indicators.

  • ISSN: 13211455
  • ISBN: 9781742497303
  • Cat. no: AUS 189
  • Pages: 500
Findings from this report:
  • 6.6 million of the 9 million households in Australia are family households; 2.1 million are single-person households

  • 4 in 5 children were developmentally on track when they started primary school in 2012

  • 2.7 million Australians—12% of the population—were informal carers in 2012

  • 2.1 million people lived on their own in 2012–13

Table of contents

  • Preliminary material
    • Title and verso pages
    • Contents
    • Preface
    • Acknowledgments
    • Quality assurance
  • Body section
    • 1 Understanding welfare
      • 1.0 Introduction
      • 1.1 Welfare in Australia
      • 1.2 Who we are
    • 2 Australia's welfare spending and workforce
      • 2.0 Introduction
      • 2.1 Welfare expenditure
      • 2.2 Labour force participation in Australia
      • 2.3 The changing face of the welfare workforce
      • 2.4 Informal carers
      • 2.5 Volunteering
    • 3 Child wellbeing (0-14)
      • 3.0 Introduction
      • 3.1 The role of the family in child wellbeing
      • 3.2 Children in child care and preschool programs
      • 3.3 Transition to primary school
      • 3.4 How are our children faring at school?
      • 3.5 Adoptions in Australia
      • 3.6 Child protection in Australia
      • 3.7 Young people aged 10–14 under youth justice supervision
      • 3.8 Wellbeing of Indigenous children
      • 3.9 Closing the gap in Indigenous education
      • 3.10 Children with disability
    • 4 Young people (15–24)
      • 4.0 Introduction
      • 4.1 Pathways through education and training
      • 4.2 School retention and completion
      • 4.3 Apprenticeships and traineeships
      • 4.4 Tertiary education
      • 4.5 Opposite ends of the spectrum—participation of young people in education and work
      • 4.6 Transitions to independence
      • 4.7 How are young Australians coping?
      • 4.8 Vulnerable young people (aged 15–24)
    • 5 Working age (25–64)
      • 5.0 Introduction
      • 5.1 The welfare of our working-age population
      • 5.2 Who is looking after our children?
      • 5.3 Home alone
      • 5.4 Bricks and mortar-changing trends in home ownership
      • 5.5 Working-age support: financial assistance for families with children
      • 5.6 Working-age support: assistance with employment and training
      • 5.7 Working-age support: housing assistance
      • 5.8 Labour force participation of people with disability
      • 5.9 Older Australians staying at work
    • 6 Growing older
      • 6.0 Introduction
      • 6.1 Australians aged 85 years and over
      • 6.2 Ageing and the welfare system: pressures, opportunities and responses
      • 6.3 Older Australians and the use of aged care
      • 6.4 Mental health of older Australians
      • 6.5 Palliative care: a welfare perspective
    • 7 Diversity and disadvantage in Australia
      • 7.0 Introduction
        • 7.1 How are Indigenous Australians faring?
        • 7.2 How are people with mental illness faring?
        • 7.3 A profile of people with disability
        • 7.4 The diversity of Australia's homeless population
        • 7.5 Domestic and family violence
    • 8 Indicators of Australia's welfare
      • 8.0 Introduction
      • 8.1 Indicators of Australia's welfare
  • End matter
    • Methods and conventions
    • Symbols
    • Acronyms and abbreviations
    • Glossary
    • Index