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The burden of vaccine preventable diseases in Australia 

This report presents detailed methods and results from the Burden of Vaccine Preventable Diseases in Australia study which focused on diseases with vaccines on Australia’s National Immunisation Program (NIP) schedule. The study found the rate of vaccine preventable burden decreased by 31% between 2005 and 2015. The decrease was driven by falls for diseases that have had vaccines added to, or vaccine eligibility extended on, the NIP schedule during the past 20 years, such as HPV, pneumococcal disease and rotavirus.

A companion to this report The burden of vaccine preventable diseases in Australia—summary is also available.

The burden of vaccine preventable diseases in Australia—summary 

This summary report presents key findings from the Burden of Vaccine Preventable Diseases in Australia study which focused on diseases with vaccines on Australia’s National Immunisation Program schedule. It provides estimates of the burden of disease for each disease individually, as well as for the diseases as a group, for 2005 and 2015. Estimates of vaccine preventable disease burden among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians for a subset of diseases are also presented.

This is a companion report to The burden of vaccine preventable diseases in Australia.

Burden of tobacco use in Australia: Australian Burden of Disease Study 2015 

This report quantifies the health burden that tobacco use places on Australia. Tobacco use contributes to health burden more than any other risk factor and was responsible for 9.3% of the total burden of disease in Australia in 2015. The report highlights that health inequalities exist, with lower socioeconomic groups and more remote areas generally experiencing higher rates of disease burden due to tobacco use.

Fact sheet: Burden of tobacco use in Australia

Australian Burden of Disease Study 2015: Interactive data on disease burden 

Burden of disease is a measure of the years of healthy life lost from living with, or dying from disease and injury. The interactive data visualisations display burden estimates from the Australian Burden of Disease Study 2015. Estimates for specific diseases and injuries for Australia are for the years 2003, 2011 and 2015 and for state/territory, remoteness area and socioeconomic group for 2011 and 2015.

This is part of the Australian Burden of Disease Study: impact and causes of illness and death in Australia 2015 report. There is also another interactive data set to explore: risk factor burden.

Australian Burden of Disease Study 2015: Interactive data on risk factor burden 

Burden of disease is a measure of the years of healthy life lost from living with, or dying from disease and injury. A portion of this burden is preventable, being due to modifiable risk factors. This report provides information on the deaths and burden of disease due to risk factors included in the Australian Burden of Disease Study 2015. 

This is part of the Australian Burden of Disease Study: impact and causes of illness and death in Australia 2015 report. There is also another interactive data set to explore: disease burden.

Australian Burden of Disease Study: methods and supplementary material 2015 

This document provides a detailed description of the methods used to derive the fatal and non-fatal burden of disease (using the disability-adjusted life years, years lived with disability and years of life lost measures) for the Australian population for 2015, 2011 and 2003, as well as estimates of how much of the burden can be attributed to various risk factors. This report is targeted at those seeking to further understand results provided in the Australian Burden of Disease Study 2015.

This accompanies the Australian Burden of Disease Study: impact and causes of illness and death in Australia 2015 report.

Disease expenditure in Australia 

During 2015–16 an estimated $117.0 billion of recurrent health expenditure was able to be attributed to specific disease groups. This report provides an overview of health expenditure by patient demographics, area of expenditure, and condition being treated or managed. Conditions are reported using the Australian Burden of Disease Study groups and conditions.

Australian Burden of Disease Study 2015: fatal burden preliminary estimates  

Fatal burden is a measure of years lost due to dying prematurely and is important information for health planning and policy development.

Preliminary estimates from the Australian Burden of Disease Study 2015 study can be explored through interactive data visualisations. Fatal burden estimates by specific diseases, conditions or injuries can be viewed at the national level, by state/territory, remoteness areas and socioeconomic group. Comparisons of changes in fatal burden over time are also presented.

Impact of alcohol and illicit drug use on the burden of disease and injury in Australia: Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011  

This report quantifies the health impact that alcohol and illicit drug use place on Australia, including as risk factors for other diseases and injuries. It estimates that alcohol and illicit drugs were collectively responsible for 6.7% of Australia’s disease burden in 2011. The report highlights that health inequalities exist, with lower socioeconomic groups and more remote areas generally experiencing higher rates of disease burden due to alcohol and illicit drug use.

Family, domestic and sexual violence in Australia, 2018 

Family, domestic and sexual violence is a major health and welfare issue. It occurs across all ages, socioeconomic and demographic groups but mainly affects women and children. Indigenous women, young women and pregnant women are particularly at risk. This report explores the extent, impact and cost of family, domestic and sexual violence in Australia, and looks at what could be done to fill important data gaps.  

Health-adjusted life expectancy in Australia: expected years lived in full health 2011 

Health-adjusted life expectancy reflects the average length of time an individual can expect to live without disease or injury. This report shows that: health-adjusted life expectancy increased comparably to life expectancy; and that people in Remote and very remote areas and people in the lowest socioeconomic group expected both shorter lives and fewer years in full health compared with their counterparts in Major cities and the highest socioeconomic group.

Impact of physical inactivity as a risk factor for chronic conditions: Australian Burden of Disease  

This report details the impact of physical inactivity on disease burden in the Australian population. Results from this study suggest that prevention and intervention efforts may best be focused on sustained population-level increases in physical activity, by as little as 15 minutes each day, to avoid associated disease burden. It also highlights that health inequalities exist, with lower socioeconomic groups experiencing larger rates of disease burden due to physical inactivity.

Brain and other central nervous system cancers 

This report is the first national report to present key data specific to brain and other central nervous system (CNS) cancer. While brain and other CNS cancer is rare, it has a substantial social and economic impact on individuals, families and community. Non malignant brain and other CNS tumours also cause significant morbidity and mortality.

Risk factors to health 

Health risk factors are attributes, characteristics or exposures that increase the likelihood of a person developing a disease or health disorder. Behavioural risk factors are those that individuals have the most ability to modify. Biomedical risk factors are bodily states that are often influenced by behavioural risk factors.

The burden of chronic respiratory conditions in Australia: a detailed analysis of the Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011 

This report presents information on the disease burden of chronic respiratory conditions using data from the Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011. Respiratory conditions were the sixth leading contributor to total burden of disease in Australia, with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma and upper respiratory conditions being the greatest contributors to the respiratory burden. The burden due to respiratory conditions generally decreased over time, varied by condition severity and by population group, and some of the burden was attributed to modifiable risk factors such as tobacco use.

The burden of musculoskeletal conditions in Australia: a detailed analysis of the Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011 

This report presents findings from the Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011 on the burden of musculoskeletal conditions in Australia. Musculoskeletal conditions were the fourth leading contributor to total burden of disease in Australia, with back pain and problems, osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis being the greatest contributors to the musculoskeletal burden. The burden due to musculoskeletal conditions generally decreased over time, varied by condition severity and by population group, and some of the burden was attributed to modifiable risk factors such as overweight and obesity.

Burden of cancer in Australia: Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011 

Cancer was the greatest cause of health burden in Australia in 2011, accounting for around one-fifth of the total disease burden. Most (94%) of this burden was due to dying prematurely, with only a small proportion of the burden due to living with a cancer diagnosis. This report explores in further detail the burden of cancer in Australia, including cancer burden in Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander people, and by remoteness and socioeconomic group. It also looks at how the cancer burden has changed since 2003, and the potential burden of cancer expected in 2020.

Impact of overweight and obesity as a risk factor for chronic conditions 

This report updates and extends estimates of the burden due to overweight and obesity reported in the Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011 to include burden in people aged under 25, revised diseases linked to overweight and obesity based on the latest evidence, and estimates by socioeconomic group. The report includes scenario modelling, undertaken to assess the potential impact on future health burden if overweight and obesity in the population continues to rise or is reduced. The enhanced analysis in the report shows that 7.0% of the total health burden in Australia in 2011 is due to overweight and obesity, and that this burden increased with increasing level of socioeconomic disadvantage.

Burden of lower limb amputations due to diabetes in Australia: Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011 

The Australian Burden of Disease Study (ABDS) 2011 captured four complications of diabetes—diabetic neuropathy, diabetic foot ulcer, lower limb amputation, and vision impairment—and their prevalence and burden were estimated. This bulletin presents findings from the ABDS on the burden of diabetes-related lower limb amputations in Australia. In 2011, it was estimated that about 730,000 Australians had diagnosed diabetes, 1.7% (12,300) of whom experienced lower limb amputation. The health loss experienced as a direct result of diabetes-related lower limb amputation accounted for about 1% of total non fatal burden estimated for diabetes in 2011. This represented 456 years of healthy life lost due to living with disability in Australia.

Diabetes and chronic kidney disease as risks for other diseases: Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011 

This report aims to provide a more comprehensive picture of the full health loss attributable to diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD). It quantifies the impact of diabetes and CKD on the burden of other diseases for which there is evidence of a causal association (‘linked diseases’) to estimate the indirect burden caused by these 2 diseases. It uses disease burden estimates from the Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011 and extends the standard approach for analysis of risk factors to model diabetes and CKD as risk factors. When the indirect burden due to linked diseases was taken into account, the collective burden due to diabetes was 1.9 times as high, and CKD was 2.1 times as high, as their direct burden.