Reports

Latest reports

Trends in hospitalised injury, Australia 2007–08 to 2016–17 

The rate of hospitalised injury cases in Australia increased over the last 10 years (2007–08 to 2016–17) by an average of 1% per year. The 2 main causes of hospitalised injury in 2016–17 were Falls (41%) and Transport crashes (12%). In 2016–17, there were more hospitalised injury cases among males at all ages up to 60–64 years; after that age, rates of injury hospitalisation for women were much higher.

Trends in hospitalised injury due to falls in older people 2007–08 to 2016–17 

This report focuses on trends in fall-related hospital care for people aged 65 and over from 2002–03 to 2016–17. Rates of fall-related injury increased over the period for men (3% per year) and women (2%). The rate of fall-related hip fractures decreased by 2% per year between 2002–03 and 2016–17; in contrast, falls resulting in head injuries increased at a rate of 7% per year.

Hospitalised injury and socioeconomic influence in Australia 2015–16 

This report examined the associations between socioeconomic status and injury morbidity in Australia and looked at the effects of SES on hospitalised injury cases by age, sex, Indigenous status and by a selection of external causes of injury. Overall, the results showed that the effects of SES varied. Generally speaking, rates of hospitalised injury were higher among people from the lowest (most disadvantaged) SES category compared with rates among people from the highest (most advantaged) SES category.

Pedal cyclist injury deaths and hospitalisations 1999–00 to 2015–16 

In 2015–16, about 12,000 Australians were hospitalised for a pedal cycle-related injury representing 1 in 5 injury hospitalisations from land transport crashes. Between 1999–00 and 2015–16, 651 pedal cyclists died as the result of their injuries, an average of 38 deaths per year. The age profile of hospitalised cyclists changed over time. Rates for age groups under 25 fell by 0.6%–4.2% per year, while rates for those 25 and over rose by 5.4%–9.4%.

Mobility scooter-related injuries and deaths 

More than 4,500 people were admitted to hospital for a possible mobility scooter-related injury between 2011–12 and 2015–16, including 121 cases involving a pedestrian who was injured in a collision with a mobility scooter. Compared with a decade earlier, fall injuries most likely from a mobility scooter have increased for older Australians aged 60 and over—from about 200 to about 500 each year. Over the 10 years from 2006–07 to 2015–16, a total of 69 people aged 60 and over died from a mobility scooter-related incident. 

Injury of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people due to transport, 2010–11 to 2014–15 

The age-standardised rate for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people was 2.7 times the rate for non-Indigenous Australians for fatal cases and 1.3 times the rate for non-Indigenous Australians for serious injuries. Age-standardised rates of fatal and serious land transport injury increased with the remoteness of the person’s usual residence, regardless of Indigenous status. Fatal and serious injury rates for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people did not change significantly. 

Spinal cord injury Australia, 2015–16 

In 2015–16, 253 newly incident cases of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) due to external causes were reported to the Australian Spinal Cord Injury Register. Males accounted for 80% of traumatic SCI cases. Almost half (48%) of the traumatic SCI cases sustained in 2015–16 were due to a fall. A further 39% were due to a land transport crash.

Hospitalised injury among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 2011–12 to 2015–16 

Indigenous people were hospitalised as a result of an injury at an average of 23,000 cases per year over the 5-year period 2011–12 to 2015–16. Rates of injury were much higher overall among Indigenous Australians (3,596 per 100,000 population) compared to non-Indigenous Australians (1,874 per 100,000 population) and the rate of injury among Indigenous females was twice that of non-Indigenous females.

Electrical injuries, deaths and hospitalisations 2014–15 and 2015–16 

A total of 1,065 people hospitalised between 1 July 2014 and 30 June 2016 had sustained an electrical injury, and 55 people died as a result of electrocution or lightning strike. Almost half of people hospitalised with an electrical injury occurred while the person was in paid work (497 cases or 47%), and a further 150 people sustained an electrical injury while doing unpaid work (14%).

Use of emergency department data to enhance routine injury surveillance: technical report, 2013–14 

This report examines routinely collected national data on injury cases that attended a public hospital emergency department in Australia in 2013–14 and describes and illustrates possible applications of the data for injury surveillance. Use of different coding systems made identification of injury cases difficult in some instances. The data did not include a field for external cause of injury which markedly reduced the value of the data for injury surveillance. Despite these limitations, and while linked data studies are needed to provide a more complete assessment of emergency department injury data, the results reported here nevertheless suggest that the source has value for injury surveillance.

Hip fracture incidence and hospitalisations in Australia 2015–16 

In 2015–16, there were an estimated 18,746 new hip fractures in Australia, a crude rate of 199 hip fractures per 100,000 population aged 45 and over. This represents a decline in the rate of hip fractures over time, suggesting that measures to reduce risk factors and prevent falls are having an effect.

Trends in injury deaths, Australia 1999–00 to 2014–15 

This report focuses on trends in deaths due to injury and poisoning that occurred over the period 1999–00 to 2014–15. The age-standardised rate of injury deaths decreased from 55.4 to 47.2 deaths per 100,000 between 1999–00 and 2004–05 and changed little after that. Rates for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were generally at least twice as high as rates for non-Indigenous Australians over the period from 2001–02 to 2014–15.

Hospitalised assault injuries among men and boys 

This fact sheet examines cases of hospitalised assault against men in 2014–15. Almost 13,000 men and boys were hospitalised as a result of an assault. Rates of assault were highest at 20–24 years. Over half (61%) of all men and boys were assaulted by bodily force. The most common injury as a result of an assault was a fracture (40%). Half (53%) of all hospitalised assault injury cases involving men and boys had an unspecified person listed as the perpetrator. In cases where the perpetrator was specified, about two-thirds (64%, or 3,720) of hospitalised assault injuries were perpetrated by a person known to the victim.

Hospitalised injury due to land transport crashes 

This fact sheet focuses on hospitalised cases where a person was injured in an unintentional crash involving types of transport that operate on land. In 2014–15, nearly 57,000 people were hospitalised as the result of injuries sustained in land transport crashes. Of the cases where the crash location was specified, around 36,000 (64%) occurred in on-road crashes, and over 14,000 (26%) happened off-road. 

The fact sheet contains information about hospitalised injury cases due to land-transport crashes, particularly those that occurred on-road. This includes characteristics such as age and sex, type of road user and the main body regions affected.

Trends in hospitalised injury, Australia 1999–00 to 2014–15 

This report shows that the rate of hospitalised injury cases in Australia rose between 1999–00 and 2014–15 by an average of 1% per year. In 2014–15, case numbers and rates were higher for males than females for all age groups up to 60–64, and higher for females for those aged 65–69 and older.

Trends in hospitalised injury due to falls in older people 2002–03 to 2014–15 

This report focuses on trends in fall-related hospital care for people aged 65 and over from 2002–03 to 2014–15. Age-standardised rates of hospitalised fall injury cases increased over the period 2002–03 to 2014–15 for both men (3% per year) and women (2%). There was a decrease in the rate of hip fractures due to falls (–2% per year) between 2002–03 and 2014–15. In contrast, falls resulting in head injuries increased at a particularly high rate (7% per year).

Spinal cord injury, Australia 2014–15 

In 2014–15, 264 newly incident cases of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) due to external causes were reported to the Australian Spinal Cord Injury Register. Males accounted for 4 in 5 (80%) of traumatic SCI cases. Land transport crashes (42%) were the leading mechanism of injury for cases of traumatic SCI sustained in 2014–15, followed by Falls (40%). Around one-third (35%) were sustained during sports or leisure activities.

Eye injuries in Australia 2010–11 to 2014–15 

This report shows 51,778 people were hospitalised as a result of an eye injury in the 5-year period, 1 July 2010 to 30 June 2015; two-thirds of these were males. Falls (35%) and assaults (23%) were the most common causes of eye injuries. The most common type of eye injury was an open wound of the eyelid and periocular area (27%). Some 86,602 presentations were made to an emergency department due to an eye injury in the 2-year period, 1 July 2013 to 30 June 2015; 1% of these presentations were admitted to hospital.