Reports

Featured reports

Children’s Headline Indicators 

The Children’s Headline Indicators (CHI) are a set of 19 indicators endorsed by the Australian Health Ministers' Conference, Community and Disability Services Ministers' Conference and the Australian Education, Early Childhood Development and Youth Affairs Senior Officials Committee in 2008 (first reported in 2009). They are high level, measureable indicators that identify the immediate environments as particularly important to children’s health, development and wellbeing. The CHI are presented from 2006 to 2016 and are grouped into 3 broad topic areas—Health, Early learning and care and Family and community.

National framework for protecting Australia's children indicators 

This release updates the online data visualisations for indicators under the National Framework for Protecting Australia’s Children and the National Standards for Out-of-Home Care. It includes updated child protection indicators, along with a variety of other measures that focus on whether Australia’s children are safe and well.

Latest reports

Youth detention population in Australia 2018 

This bulletin presents information on the youth detention population in Australia from June 2014 to June 2018. Among the 980 young people in detention on an average night in the June quarter 2018, most were male (90%), aged 10–17 (84%), unsentenced (60%), and Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander (54%). Over the 4-year period, the number of young people in detention rose, though rates fluctuated across quarters.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adolescent and youth health and wellbeing 2018 

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adolescent and youth health and wellbeing 2018 report provides comprehensive data on the health and wellbeing of Indigenous people aged 10–24. Information on health and wellbeing outcomes, health determinants, risk factors, and health and welfare service use for Indigenous youth are included. Data are disaggregated by age group, sex, state and territory and remoteness areas, as well as trend information. The report also examines differences between young Indigenous and non-Indigenous people on key health and wellbeing measures. 

Young people in child protection and under youth justice supervision: 1 July 2013 to 30 June 2017 

This report presents information on people aged 10–17 who were in the child protection system and under youth justice supervision from 1 July 2013 to 30 June 2017. Young people under youth justice supervision were 9 times as likely as the general population to be in the child protection system. Indigenous Australians were 17 times as likely as their non-Indigenous counterpart to be both in the child protection system and under youth justice supervision.

Overlap between youth justice supervision and alcohol and other drug treatment services: 1 July 2012 to 30 June 2016 

This report examines the overlap between alcohol and other drug treatment services and youth justice supervision from 1 July 2012 to 30 June 2016. Compared with the age-equivalent Australian population, those who had youth justice supervision were 30 times as likely to have an alcohol and other drug treatment service, and those who received an alcohol and other drug treatment service were 30 times as likely to have youth justice supervision.

Child and maternal health in 2013–2015 

This report presents findings on four indicators measuring the health of babies and their mothers: infant and young child deaths, the rate of low birthweight babies, mothers smoking during pregnancy, and antenatal care visits during the first trimester of pregnancy.  

The report shows that despite generally positive results across these indicators nationally, these positive trends are not seen equally across Australia’s 31 Primary Health Network (PHN) areas. 

This report was first published on the MyHealthyCommunities website.

Cancer in adolescents and young adults in Australia 

This report is the second national report to present key data specific to cancer in adolescents and young adults. While cancer in young Australians is rare, it has a substantial social and economic impact on individuals, families and the community. Surveillance of this population is also important as adolescent and young adult cancer survivors are at an increased risk of developing a second cancer. 
 

Spatial analysis of child deaths in New South Wales 

While child mortality rates in New South Wales have declined significantly over the 15 years between 2001 and 2015, there is still a great deal of geographic variation in the number and rate of child deaths. This report presents information on the geographic distribution of child deaths across New South Wales and shows that child mortality rates are higher in more disadvantaged areas, such as those with higher poverty rates, lower school engagement, overcrowded housing and higher rates of developmental vulnerability. 

Immunisation rates for children in 2016–17 

Immunisation is important in protecting children from harmful infectious diseases. This web update presents 2016–17 immunisation rates for all children and Aboriginal and Torrest Strait Islander children aged 1, 2 and 5. Rates are presented for the 31 Primary Health Network (PHN) areas, more than 300 smaller local areas and around 1,600 postcodes across Australia.

This report was first published on the MyHealthyCommunities website.

HPV immunisation rates in 2015–16 

Immunisation against the human papillomavirus (HPV) can prevent cervical and other cancers, and other HPV-related diseases. The National HPV Vaccination Program has been immunising adolescent girls since 2007 and was extended to boys in 2013.

This release shows HPV Immunisation rates in 2015-16. Rates are reported separately for girls and boys aged 15.  Data is reported at a national level and by PHN and SA4.

This report was first published on the former MyHealthyCommunities website.

Family, domestic and sexual violence in Australia, 2018 

Family, domestic and sexual violence is a major health and welfare issue. It occurs across all ages, socioeconomic and demographic groups but mainly affects women and children. Indigenous women, young women and pregnant women are particularly at risk. This report explores the extent, impact and cost of family, domestic and sexual violence in Australia, and looks at what could be done to fill important data gaps.  

Northern Territory Remote Aboriginal Investment: Oral Health Programs, July 2012 to December 2016 

The Australian Government has been funding oral health services for Indigenous children in the Northern Territory since 2007. In 2016, 3,426 Indigenous children received clinical services, and preventive services such as full-mouth fluoride varnish applications were provided to 4,502 Indigenous children and fissure sealant services to 2,019 children. Tooth decay experience varied by age, with 90% of children aged 6 and 88% of 9-year olds having tooth decay. There have been improvements in the oral health of younger service recipients, with the average amount of tooth decay in children aged 1–3 decreasing by 19%, and an 11% decrease among 8 year olds between 2013 and 2016. 

Juvenile arthritis 

Juvenile arthritis includes several different kinds of arthritis occurring in children, causing significant pain, disability and restrictions in school and other activities. Juvenile arthritis affects less than 1% of children and is more common in girls than boys.

Young people returning to sentenced youth justice supervision 2015–16 

The majority of young people who receive a supervised youth justice sentence serve only 1 sentence, and do not return. For those born from 1990–91 to 1997–98, about 61% had only 1 sentence before the age of 18. Of the young people aged 10–16 in 2014–15 who were released from sentenced community-based supervision, about 22% returned to sentenced supervision in 6 months, and 46% returned within 12 months. Of those released from sentenced detention, 48% returned to sentenced supervision within 6 months, and 74% returned within 12 months.

Immunisation rates for children in 2015–16  

Immunisation is important in protecting children from harmful infectious diseases. Our most recent immunisation report shows the large majority of Australian children continue to be immunised and that rates have increased over time, but there is room for improvement in some local areas. The report focuses on immunisation rates for 5-year-old children and also includes results for children aged 1 and 2. Rates are presented for the 31 Primary Health Network (PHN) areas, more than 300 smaller local areas and around 1500 postcodes across Australia. Rates are also presented for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children. 

This report was first published on the MyHealthyCommunities website.

HPV immunisation rates in 2014–15 

Immunisation against the highly contagious human papillomavirus (HPV) can prevent cervical and other cancers, and other HPV-related diseases. The National HPV Vaccination Program has been immunising adolescent girls since 2007 and was extended to boys in 2013.

This report on HPV immunisation shows the percentage of girls aged 15 across 31 Primary Health Network (PHN) areas who were fully immunised against HPV in 2014–15. For the first time, the percentage of boys fully immunised are also shown by PHN area.

This report was first published on the MyHealthyCommunities website.

Specialist homelessness services 2015–16 

The specialist homelessness services 2015–16 web report is the fifth annual report from the Specialist Homelessness Services Collection (SHSC). It describes the characteristics of clients of specialist homelessness services, the services requested, outcomes achieved, and unmet requests for services during 2015–16.

Youth detention population in Australia 2016 

This bulletin presents information on the youth detention population in Australia, focusing on quarterly trends from June 2012 to June 2016. There were just over 900 young people in detention on an average night in the June quarter 2016, just over half (57%) of whom were unsentenced. Numbers and rates of young people in detention dropped slightly over the 4 years, despite a slight increase in the most recent year. Just over half (55%) of all young people in detention on an average night were Indigenous.

Vulnerable young people: interactions across homelessness, youth justice and child protection: 1 July 2011 to 30 June 2015 

This report reveals that individuals who experience multiple, cross-sector services in the specialist homelessness, protection or youth justice service areas are a particularly vulnerable group. Clients experiencing 2 or more of these services were more likely than specialist homelessness services-only clients: to report having substance use issues; to report having mental health issues; to have an over-representation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people; and to receive more days of support and more support periods from specialist homelessness services agencies.

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) among children and young people with type 1 diabetes 

This fact sheet provides the most recent available data on hospitalisations for diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA)—a serious complication of diabetes. It highlights that DKA continues to affect many children and young people with type 1 diabetes, in particular females and those living in regional and remote areas and in lower socioeconomic areas.