Reports

Latest reports

MyHealthyCommunities: Child and maternal health in 2014–2016 

Four key maternal and child health indicators have been updated in this release — smoking during pregnancy, child and infant mortality, low birthweight babies, and antenatal visits in the first trimester of pregnancy. Indicators are reported nationally, by Primary Health Network (PHN) areas and by smaller local areas.

National Core Maternity Indicators 

The National Core Maternity Indicators (NCMI) present information on measures of clinical activity and outcomes. The purpose of the NCMIs is to assist in improving the quality of maternity services in Australia by establishing baseline data for monitoring and evaluating practice change. These indicators cover data for the majority of women who gave birth in Australia from 2004 to 2016 and are grouped into 3 broad topic areas—antenatal period, labour and birth and birth outcomes.

Perinatal data visualisations 

These data visualisations provide an overview of mothers and babies, maternal demographics, the antenatal period, labour and birth, and baby outcomes. Data from the AIHW National Perinatal Data Collection are currently presented for the years 2010–2016.

Perinatal deaths in Australia 2013–2014 

The perinatal mortality rate in Australia in 2013–2014 was low (9.7 deaths per 1,000 births). Perinatal mortality rates increased with low birthweight for gestational age, Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander ethnicity and a number of other demographic factors. Perinatal death was most commonly caused by congenital anomaly and spontaneous preterm birth.

Teenage mothers in Australia 2015 

This report presents key statistics and trends for teenage mothers and their babies in Australia. Teenage mothers and their babies are more likely to experience broader disadvantage, have antenatal risk factors and have poorer maternal and baby outcomes during and after birth, than older mothers and their babies. In Australia, the rate of teenage births has decreased between 2005 and 2015, from 17.5 births per 1,000 women to 11.4. In 2015, 8,268 babies were born to 8,203 teenage mothers aged less than 20, accounting for 2.7% of all mothers.

MyHealthyCommunities: Child and maternal health in 2013–2015 

This MyHealthyCommunities release report, Child and maternal health 2013–2015, presents findings on four indicators measuring the health of babies and their mothers: infant and young child deaths, the rate of low birthweight babies, mothers smoking during pregnancy, and antenatal care visits during the first trimester of pregnancy.  

The report shows that despite generally positive results across these indicators nationally, these positive trends are not seen equally across Australia’s 31 Primary Health Network (PHN) areas. 

Enhancing maternity data collection and reporting in Australia: National Maternity Data Development Project: Stage 3 and 4 working paper 

This working paper presents findings of Stage 3 and 4 of the National Maternity Data Development Project, which was established in response to the National Maternity Services Plan. Stage 3 and 4 has seen substantial progress in: data development for psychosocial data items; the development of ongoing maternal and perinatal mortality data collections reporting; and the development of a data portal for the maternity models of care data collection.

Maternal deaths in Australia 2012–2014 

The maternal mortality rate in Australia in 2012–2014 was 6.8 deaths per 100,000 women giving birth, which is among the lowest rates in the world. The most common causes of maternal death were bleeding in the brain and in the abdomen (non-obstetric haemorrhage). Women over the age of 35 and under 20 were more likely to die in association with childbirth.

Perinatal deaths in Australia 1993–2012 

This report presents an analysis of the statistics for stillbirths and neonatal deaths in Australia for the calendar years 2011 and 2012, as well as selected trend information for 1993–2012. The aim of this report is to gain a better understanding of the characteristics and causes of stillbirths and neonatal deaths in Australia at a population level and identify changes in perinatal mortality over time. This report is one of several components of the National Maternity Data Development Project.

National Core Maternity Indicators stage 3 and 4 results from 2010–2013 

National Core Maternity Indicators (NCMIs) are designed to assist in improving the quality of maternity services in Australia by establishing baseline data for monitoring and evaluating practice change. This report and the data portal covers the period from 2004 to 2013, and includes data for the vast majority of women who gave birth in Australia over that period. The 10 measures previously reported have been updated with 2010–2013 perinatal data, while 2 new measures are reported for the first time. Data are presented by jurisdiction, by Primary Health Network, and at the national level by hospital annual number of births, hospital sector, and mother’s Indigenous status. Some indicators are presented by remoteness.

Peripartum hysterectomy in Australia: a working paper using the National Hospital Morbidity Database 2003–04 to 2013–14 

Peripartum hysterectomy, a life-saving procedure to stop haemorrhage after giving birth, can have considerable consequences for mothers and their babies. This working paper analyses 11 years of national hospitalisation data to derive the estimated rate of peripartum hysterectomy in Australia in recent years and examine the rates of diagnoses for particular conditions contributing to peripartum hysterectomy. This is part of the National Maternity Data Development Project’s work to develop national data standards for maternal morbidity data items.

Monitoring the health impacts of mandatory folic acid and iodine fortification 2016 

This report assesses the health effects of mandatory folic acid and iodine fortification, introduced to help reduce the prevalence of neural tube defects and address the re emergence of iodine deficiency in the population. Mandatory fortification resulted in increased levels of folic acid and iodine in the food supply, increased folic acid and iodine intakes, a decreased rate of neural tube defects in Australia, and improved iodine status in the general populations in Australia and New Zealand.

Folic acid & iodine fortification 

Mandatory folic acid and iodine fortification of bread resulted in increased levels of folic acid and iodine in the food supply, increased folic acid and iodine intakes, a decreased rate of neural tube defects in Australia, and improved iodine status in the general populations in Australia and New Zealand.

Enhancing maternity data collection and reporting in Australia: National Maternity Data Development Project Stage 2 

This report presents findings of Stage 2 of the National Maternity Data Development Project, which was established in response to the National Maternity Services Plan. The aim of the Project is to build a more comprehensive and consistent national data collection for maternal and perinatal health. Stage 2 has seen substantial progress in: data development for clinical data items and maternity models of care; maternal and perinatal mortality reporting; and online dissemination of perinatal data.

Maternity Care Classification System: Maternity Model of Care Data Set Specification national pilot report November 2014 

The Maternity Care Classification System, or MaCCS, was developed as part of the National Maternity Data Development Project to provide a comprehensive classification system for maternity models of care operating in Australia. This report describes a pilot test that was conducted as part of the data development work on an important element of the MaCCS: the Maternity Model of Care Data Set Specification. Included in the report is a background description of the work, methodology, logistics and the results of the pilot.