Reports

Featured reports

Australian Burden of Disease Study: impact and causes of illness and death in Australia 2011 

This report analyses the impact of nearly 200 diseases and injuries in terms of living with illness (non-fatal burden) and premature death (fatal burden). The study found that chronic diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular diseases, mental and substance use disorders, and musculoskeletal conditions, along with injury contributed the most burden in Australia in 2011. Almost one third of the overall disease burden could be prevented by removing exposure to risk factors such as tobacco use, high body mass, alcohol use, physical inactivity and high blood pressure.

Australian Burden of Disease Study: impact and causes of illness and death in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 2011 

This report provides estimates of the non-fatal and fatal burden of disease for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population as well as estimates of the gap in disease burden between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. The disease groups causing the most burden among Indigenous Australians in 2011 were mental and substance use disorders, injuries, cardiovascular diseases, cancer and respiratory diseases. Indigenous Australians experienced a burden of disease that was 2.3 times the rate of non-Indigenous Australians. Over one third of the overall disease burden experienced by Indigenous Australians could be prevented by removing exposure to risk factors such as tobacco and alcohol use, high body mass, physical inactivity and high blood pressure.

Brain and other central nervous system cancers 

This report is the first national report to present key data specific to brain and other central nervous system (CNS) cancer. While brain and other CNS cancer is rare, it has a substantial social and economic impact on individuals, families and community. Non malignant brain and other CNS tumours also cause significant morbidity and mortality.

Risk factors to health 

Health risk factors are attributes, characteristics or exposures that increase the likelihood of a person developing a disease or health disorder. Behavioural risk factors are those that individuals have the most ability to modify. Biomedical risk factors are bodily states that are often influenced by behavioural risk factors.

The burden of chronic respiratory conditions in Australia: a detailed analysis of the Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011 

This report presents information on the disease burden of chronic respiratory conditions using data from the Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011. Respiratory conditions were the sixth leading contributor to total burden of disease in Australia, with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma and upper respiratory conditions being the greatest contributors to the respiratory burden. The burden due to respiratory conditions generally decreased over time, varied by condition severity and by population group, and some of the burden was attributed to modifiable risk factors such as tobacco use.

The burden of musculoskeletal conditions in Australia: a detailed analysis of the Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011 

This report presents findings from the Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011 on the burden of musculoskeletal conditions in Australia. Musculoskeletal conditions were the fourth leading contributor to total burden of disease in Australia, with back pain and problems, osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis being the greatest contributors to the musculoskeletal burden. The burden due to musculoskeletal conditions generally decreased over time, varied by condition severity and by population group, and some of the burden was attributed to modifiable risk factors such as overweight and obesity.

Burden of cancer in Australia: Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011 

Cancer was the greatest cause of health burden in Australia in 2011, accounting for around one-fifth of the total disease burden. Most (94%) of this burden was due to dying prematurely, with only a small proportion of the burden due to living with a cancer diagnosis. This report explores in further detail the burden of cancer in Australia, including cancer burden in Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander people, and by remoteness and socioeconomic group. It also looks at how the cancer burden has changed since 2003, and the potential burden of cancer expected in 2020.

Impact of overweight and obesity as a risk factor for chronic conditions 

This report updates and extends estimates of the burden due to overweight and obesity reported in the Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011 to include burden in people aged under 25, revised diseases linked to overweight and obesity based on the latest evidence, and estimates by socioeconomic group. The report includes scenario modelling, undertaken to assess the potential impact on future health burden if overweight and obesity in the population continues to rise or is reduced. The enhanced analysis in the report shows that 7.0% of the total health burden in Australia in 2011 is due to overweight and obesity, and that this burden increased with increasing level of socioeconomic disadvantage.

Burden of lower limb amputations due to diabetes in Australia: Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011 

The Australian Burden of Disease Study (ABDS) 2011 captured four complications of diabetes—diabetic neuropathy, diabetic foot ulcer, lower limb amputation, and vision impairment—and their prevalence and burden were estimated. This bulletin presents findings from the ABDS on the burden of diabetes-related lower limb amputations in Australia. In 2011, it was estimated that about 730,000 Australians had diagnosed diabetes, 1.7% (12,300) of whom experienced lower limb amputation. The health loss experienced as a direct result of diabetes-related lower limb amputation accounted for about 1% of total non fatal burden estimated for diabetes in 2011. This represented 456 years of healthy life lost due to living with disability in Australia.

Diabetes and chronic kidney disease as risks for other diseases: Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011 

This report aims to provide a more comprehensive picture of the full health loss attributable to diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD). It quantifies the impact of diabetes and CKD on the burden of other diseases for which there is evidence of a causal association (‘linked diseases’) to estimate the indirect burden caused by these 2 diseases. It uses disease burden estimates from the Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011 and extends the standard approach for analysis of risk factors to model diabetes and CKD as risk factors. When the indirect burden due to linked diseases was taken into account, the collective burden due to diabetes was 1.9 times as high, and CKD was 2.1 times as high, as their direct burden.

Contribution of vascular diseases and risk factors to the burden of dementia in Australia: Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011 

This report describes a range of modifiable vascular risk factors for dementia, and estimates their individual and combined contribution to the burden of dementia in Australia. Vascular risk factors in this study include smoking, physical inactivity, mid-life high blood pressure and mid-life obesity, as well as vascular diseases that act as risk factors for dementia—diabetes, stroke, atrial fibrillation and chronic kidney disease. It uses burden of disease estimates from the Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011 and evidence in the literature that shows a link between these vascular risk factors and development of dementia in later life. It shows that about 30% of the total dementia burden in Australia is due to the joint effect of the vascular risk factors examined; highlighting the potential for preventing dementia and reducing dementia-related burden.

Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011: methods and supplementary material 

This document provides a detailed description of the methods used to derive the fatal and non-fatal burden of disease (using the disability-adjusted life years, years lived with disability and years of life lost measures) for the Australian and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations for 2011 and 2003, as well as estimates of how much of the burden can be attributed to various risk factors . The report is targeted at researchers and epidemiologists, and those seeking to further understand results provided in the Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011.