Reports

Featured reports

Child protection Australia 2015–16 

During 2015–16, 162,175 (30.2 per 1,000) Australian children received child protection services (investigation, care and protection order and/or were in out-of-home care). Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children were 7 times as likely as non-Indigenous children to have received child protection services. This report also showed that children from geographically remote areas were more likely to be the subject of a substantiation, or be in out-of-home care than those from major cities.

Adoptions Australia 2016–17 

Adoptions Australia 2016–17, the 27th report in the series, presents the latest data on adoptions of Australian children and children from overseas, and highlights important trends in the number of adoptions back to 1992–93. Data cover characteristics of adopted children, their parents and adoptive families, as well as applications and vetoes for contact and information exchange, issued immigration visas and intercountry processing times.

Children admitted to out-of-home care 2014–15 

This bulletin includes national trends on children admitted to out-of-home care, and the out-of-home care experience for children admitted in 2014–15 (excluding New South Wales), including:

  • Infants and Indigenous children are over-represented in admissions between 2011–12 and 2015–16.
  • 55% of the children admitted during 2014–15 were still in out-of-home care at 30 June 2016.
  • 61% of children discharged left within 6 months of their admission; 82% left within 12 months.

Young people in child protection and under youth justice supervision 2015–16 

This report presents information on people aged 10–16 who were in the child protection system and under youth justice supervision from 1 July 2014 to 30 June 2016. Young people under youth justice supervision were 12 times as likely as the general population to be in the child protection system. Indigenous Australians were 16 times as likely as their non-Indigenous counterpart to be both in the child protection system and under youth justice supervision.

Specialist homelessness services 2015–16 

The specialist homelessness services 2015–16 web report is the fifth annual report from the Specialist Homelessness Services Collection (SHSC). It describes the characteristics of clients of specialist homelessness services, the services requested, outcomes achieved, and unmet requests for services during 2015–16.

Vulnerable young people: interactions across homelessness, youth justice and child protection: 1 July 2011 to 30 June 2015 

This report reveals that individuals who experience multiple, cross-sector services in the specialist homelessness, protection or youth justice service areas are a particularly vulnerable group. Clients experiencing 2 or more of these services were more likely than specialist homelessness services-only clients: to report having substance use issues; to report having mental health issues; to have an over-representation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people; and to receive more days of support and more support periods from specialist homelessness services agencies.

Permanency planning in child protection: a review of current concepts and available data 2016 

Permanency planning and long-term care for children in out-of-home care can involve family reunification, third-party parental responsibility orders, long-term finalised guardianship/custody orders and adoptions by carers. This report describes concepts and available data in this area, and development work being undertaken to improve national reporting. Available data indicate: there were 31,129 children on finalised guardianship/custody orders and 9,070 children on finalised third-party parental responsibility orders at 30 June 2015; there were 94 adoptions by carers finalised in 2014–15; most (87%) children who had been continuously in care for 2 or more years had also spent at least 2 years in one main care arrangement.

Child protection Australia 2014–15 

This report contains comprehensive information on state and territory child protection and support services in 2014-15, and on the characteristics of Australian children within the child protection system. This report shows that: 151,980 children, a rate of 28.6 per 1,000 children, received child protection services (investigation, care and protection order and/or were in out-of-home care); three-quarters (73%) of these children had previously been the subject of an investigation, care and protection order and/or were in out-of-home care; Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children were 7 times as likely as non-Indigenous children to be receiving child protection services.

The views of children and young people in out-of-home care: overview of indicator results from a pilot national survey 2015 

This bulletin presents an overview of results from a 2015 national pilot data collection on the views of children in out-of-home care. Key findings include 91% of children reporting feeling both safe and settled in their current placement; 97% reporting that they had an adult who cares about what happens to them now and in the future; and 67% reporting that they usually get to have a say in what happens to them, and that people usually listen to what they say.

Young people in child protection and under youth justice supervision 2013–14 

This report presents information on young people aged 10–17 who were involved in the child protection system and under youth justice supervision in 2013–14, and demonstrates the insights that can be gained through data linkage. Nearly half (45%) of young people in youth justice detention were also in the child protection system in the same year. Those who were younger at their first youth justice supervision were more likely to also be in child protection.

Specialist homelessness services 2014–15 

The Specialist homelessness services 2014–15 web report is the fourth annual report from the Specialist Homelessness Services Collection and the first presented as a web report. It describes the characteristics of clients of specialist homelessness services, the services requested, outcomes achieved, and unmet requests for services during 2014–15.

Developing a linked data collection to report on the relationships between child protection and youth justice supervision 

Using available national data to understand the characteristics of children and young people who are both in the child protection system and under youth justice supervision, and their pathways through these systems, would assist support staff, case workers and policy makers to achieve optimal outcomes for children and young people and for their families. This report describes how these data collections can be linked and how the relationships between child protection and youth justice supervision can be explored.

Educational outcomes for children in care: linking 2013 child protection and NAPLAN data 

This report presents a snapshot of the academic performance of Australian children in the care of child protection services in 2013. Findings are based on the linkage of data from the Child Protection National Minimum Data Set and the National Assessment Program—Literacy and Numeracy. This report shows that the proportion of children in care meeting the national minimum standards (NMS) for literacy and numeracy varied (ranging from 44% to 83% across assessment domains and year levels).

Literature review of the impact of early childhood education and care on learning and development 

Early childhood education and care is a key priority for the Australian Government in recognition that ECEC programs play a vital role in the development of Australian children and their preparation for school, and enabling parents to work. This review explores the literature on the complex relationship between attendance at early childhood education and care programs and developmental outcomes for children.

Child protection Australia 2013–14 

This report contains comprehensive information on state and territory child protection and support services in 2013-14, and the characteristics of Australian children within the child protection system. This report shows that: around 143,000 children, a rate of 27.2 per 1,000 children, received child protection services (investigation, care and protection order and/or in out-of-home care); three-quarters (73%) of these children had previously been the subject of an investigation, care and protection order and/or out-of-home care placement; Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children were 7 times as likely as non-Indigenous children to be receiving child protection services.

National outcome measures for early childhood development—phase 2: scoping paper 

This report presents the results of Phase 2 of the National Outcome Measures for Early Childhood Development project. It identifies potential indicators for 5 indicator topic areas (child behavioural problems, peer relationships, racism, school engagement and parenting quality/capacity) and potential data sources for a further 2 (social and emotional wellbeing, and family social networks).

A new approach to national child protection data: implementation of the Child Protection National Minimum Data Set 

Over the past few years, the AIHW, with dedicated national resources made available through the Australian Government, has worked with all jurisdictions to implement a new Child Protection National Minimum Data Set (CP NMDS) for reporting on child protection. This working paper describes the development and implementation of the CP NMDS and highlights key new analyses able to be reported for the first time at the national level. It also outlines the need for ongoing development work.

Child protection Australia 2012-13 

Child protection Australia 2012–13 represents a significant milestone in national child protection reporting as it is the first time that unit record level data have been available for analysis and reporting. This report shows that: - there were 135,000 children, a rate of 26.1 per 1,000 children, receiving child protection services (investigation; care and protection order; and/or placed in out-of-home care). - more than half (56%) of these children were subject only to an investigation (that is, they were not subsequently placed on an order or in out-of-home care) while 8% were involved in all three components of the system. - in 2012–13, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children were 8 times as likely as non-Indigenous children to be receiving child protection services.

Indigenous child safety 

Indigenous children are over represented in areas where child safety and security are compromised. This report shows that Indigenous children aged 0–17 have higher rates of hospitalisations and deaths due to injury than non Indigenous children; are more likely to be victims of child abuse, neglect and sexual assault; and are over represented in homelessness and youth justice statistics.

Development of an ongoing national data collection on the educational outcomes of children in child protection services: a working paper 

Improving the educational outcomes of children involved in statutory child protection services has been a high priority for Australian governments in recent years. This working paper provides an overview of a proposed national linked dataset on the educational activity and outcomes of children while in child protection services, to allow ongoing and longitudinal monitoring of the academic progress, and to better inform policy, practice and planning of activities to support these children. National linkage of multiple administrative data sources is proposed, with the aim of capturing a variety of data across the primary and secondary schooling years.