Summary of findings

  • Ex-serving ADF members’ use of homelessness services was lower than the Australian population—1.1% compared with 3.4%.
  • Ex-serving ADF members who were women, younger, or had less ADF experience were more likely to be SHS clients.
  • At the start of support, clients can be categorised either as homeless or at risk of becoming homeless. Of ex-serving ADF SHS clients whose housing situation was known at the start of support, 46% were homeless and 54% were at risk of becoming homeless.
  • At the end of support, clients can be categorised either as homeless or in stable housing. Of ex-serving ADF SHS clients whose housing situation was known at the end of support, 41% were homeless and 59% were in stable housing.
  • Of the 54% ex-serving ADF SHS clients who were at risk of homelessness at the start of support, the majority (82%) were in stable housing at the end of support.
  • At the start of support, half (49%) of ex-serving ADF SHS clients lived alone, 16% were single parents with children and 13% lived as a couple with children.
  • Male ex-serving ADF SHS clients required and used more accommodation services compared with ex-serving women.
  • During the reporting period, 38% of ex-serving ADF SHS clients received accommodation compared with 29% of Australian SHS clients.
  • More than half (53%) of female ex-serving ADF SHS clients also needed domestic and family violence services. This reflects the association between the use of domestic and family violence services and the use of homelessness services found among female Australian SHS clients.
  • Accommodation, financial and interpersonal reasons were the most common main reasons for seeking SHS assistance.
  • Ex-serving ADF SHS clients with complex care needs (including a current mental health issue, problematic drug and/or alcohol use and disability) required and used more services than ex-serving clients without these needs. This was also the case among Australian SHS clients.