Reports

Featured reports

Latest reports

Improving national reporting on diabetes in pregnancy: technical report 

Monitoring diabetes during pregnancy provides important information on the impact of diabetes during and after pregnancy on the health of mother and child. This report:

  • describes national data sources available for monitoring the effects of diabetes during pregnancy on mothers and babies
  • identifies current data gaps, alternate data sources for monitoring outcomes associated with diabetes in pregnancy, and possible data linkages to improve national monitoring of pregnancies affected by diabetes. 

Diabetes in pregnancy 2014–2015 

This report examines the short-term impact of pre-existing diabetes (type 1 or type 2) and gestational diabetes on mothers in pregnancy and their babies between 2014 and 2015. The report analyses data from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare National Perinatal Data Collection.

Indicators of socioeconomic inequalities in cardiovascular disease, diabetes and chronic kidney disease 

People who are socioeconomically disadvantaged have, on average, greater levels of cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD). In 2016, males and females living in the lowest socioeconomic areas of Australia had higher prevalence rates of type 2 diabetes and treated end-stage kidney disease; higher heart attack rates; and higher CVD, diabetes and CKD death rates than those living in the highest socioeconomic areas.

Diabetes indicators for the Australian National Diabetes Strategy 2016–2020 

Diabetes indicators for the Australian National Diabetes Strategy 2016–2020 provides baseline data for the 55 indicators identified in the Diabetes in Australia: focus on the future implementation plan. These indicators aim to inform the evidence base for assessing progress against the seven high-level goals outlined in Australian National Diabetes Strategy 2016–2020. These goals relate to the prevention, early detection, management and care of all forms of diabetes in Australia.

Deaths among people with diabetes in Australia, 2009–2014 

This report uses linked data to provide a more complete understanding of deaths among people with diagnosed diabetes. It highlights that death rates for people with diabetes are almost double those of other Australians and that people with diabetes are more likely to die prematurely. Between 2009 and 2014, death rates fell by 20% for people with type 1 diabetes but rose by 10% for those with type 2 diabetes.

Risk factors to health 

Health risk factors are attributes, characteristics or exposures that increase the likelihood of a person developing a disease or health disorder. Behavioural risk factors are those that individuals have the most ability to modify. Biomedical risk factors are bodily states that are often influenced by behavioural risk factors.

Burden of lower limb amputations due to diabetes in Australia: Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011 

The Australian Burden of Disease Study (ABDS) 2011 captured four complications of diabetes—diabetic neuropathy, diabetic foot ulcer, lower limb amputation, and vision impairment—and their prevalence and burden were estimated. This bulletin presents findings from the ABDS on the burden of diabetes-related lower limb amputations in Australia. In 2011, it was estimated that about 730,000 Australians had diagnosed diabetes, 1.7% (12,300) of whom experienced lower limb amputation. The health loss experienced as a direct result of diabetes-related lower limb amputation accounted for about 1% of total non fatal burden estimated for diabetes in 2011. This represented 456 years of healthy life lost due to living with disability in Australia.

Incidence of insulin-treated diabetes in Australia 2015 data visualisations 

The Incidence of insulin-treated diabetes in Australia 2015 data visualisations provides data on insulin-treated diabetes, including type 1, type 2 and gestational diabetes. Data are disaggregated by age at first insulin use, Indigenous status, remoteness, SEIFA, state/territory, and trends for type 1 diabetes and insulin-treated type 2 diabetes.

Incidence of insulin-treated diabetes in Australia, 2015 

This fact sheet provides the latest available national data on new cases of insulin-treated diabetes in Australia. It shows that in 2015 there were 28,775 people who began using insulin to treat their diabetes in Australia—63% had type 2 diabetes, 26% had gestational diabetes, 9% had type 1 diabetes and 2% had other forms of diabetes or their diabetes status was unknown. The fact sheet is accompanied by a dynamic data display, which provides data on insulin-treated diabetes by age at first insulin use, Indigenous status, remoteness, SEIFA and state/territory.

Diabetes and chronic kidney disease as risks for other diseases: Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011 

This report aims to provide a more comprehensive picture of the full health loss attributable to diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD). It quantifies the impact of diabetes and CKD on the burden of other diseases for which there is evidence of a causal association (‘linked diseases’) to estimate the indirect burden caused by these 2 diseases. It uses disease burden estimates from the Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011 and extends the standard approach for analysis of risk factors to model diabetes and CKD as risk factors. When the indirect burden due to linked diseases was taken into account, the collective burden due to diabetes was 1.9 times as high, and CKD was 2.1 times as high, as their direct burden.

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) among children and young people with type 1 diabetes 

This fact sheet provides the most recent available data on hospitalisations for diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA)—a serious complication of diabetes. It highlights that DKA continues to affect many children and young people with type 1 diabetes, in particular females and those living in regional and remote areas and in lower socioeconomic areas.

Use of medicines by older people with type 2 diabetes 

This report describes dispensing patterns of glucose lowering medicines and medicines for other conditions associated with diabetes in a concessional population cohort of Australians aged 65 and over diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. It uses linked data from the National Diabetes Services Scheme and the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme to explore medicine supply patterns in 2012 by age and time since diabetes diagnosis. It shows that, in general, the longer the time since diagnosis, the more likely it is that an individual would be supplied with all medicine types and the more intense their glucose lowering treatment regimens would be. This report highlights the complexity of pharmacological management in older people with type 2 diabetes and the diversity of medicine supply patterns in relation to age and time since diabetes diagnosis.

Incidence of insulin-treated diabetes in Australia 2014 

Incidence of insulin-treated diabetes in Australia 2014 presents the latest available national data on new cases of insulin-treated diabetes from the 2014 National (insulin-treated) Diabetes Register. In 2014, nearly 30,000 Australians began using insulin to treat their diabetes—67% had type 2 diabetes, 23% had gestational diabetes, 9% had type 1 diabetes and 2% had other forms of diabetes. Almost 2 in 3 (63%) people diagnosed with type 1 diabetes were aged under 25, whereas almost all (93%) new cases of insulin-treated type 2 diabetes occurred in those aged over 40.

Cardiovascular disease, diabetes and chronic kidney disease—Australian facts: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 

Cardiovascular disease, diabetes and chronic kidney disease—Australian facts is a series of 5 reports by the National Centre for Monitoring Vascular Diseases at the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare that describe the combined burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD). This report on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people presents up-to-date statistics on risk factors, prevalence, hospitalisation and deaths from these 3 chronic diseases. It examines age and sex characteristics and variations by geographical location and compares these with the non-Indigenous population.

Prevalence of type 1 diabetes among children aged 0–14 in Australia 2013 

Prevalence of type 1 diabetes among children aged 0–14 in Australia 2013 presents the first national picture of children aged 0–14 living with type 1 diabetes in Australia. The report, based on data from the National (insulin-treated) Diabetes Register, highlights that in 2013, 6,091 children aged 0–14 had type 1 diabetes in Australia. This represented 139 cases per 100,000 population, or about 1 in 720 Australians aged 0–14. About 2 in 5 children with type 1 diabetes used an insulin pump to administer insulin. The prevalence of type 1 diabetes among children differed by age, state/territory, and residential remoteness areas.

Incidence of type 1 diabetes in Australia 2000–2013 

Incidence of type 1 diabetes in Australia, 2000–2013 presents the latest available national data on new cases of type 1 diabetes from Australia’s National (insulin-treated) Diabetes Register. In 2013, there were 2,323 new cases of type 1 diabetes in Australia, equating to 11 cases per 100,000 population. This rate has remained relatively stable between 2000 and 2013, fluctuating between 10 and 13 cases per 100,000 population each year.