Reports

Latest reports

International health data comparisons, 2018 

Comparing health and health care data between countries facilitates international comparative reporting, supports policy planning and decision-making, and enables health-related research and analysis.

The interactive data visualisations across these web pages allow you to compare the most recent data from 36 Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) member countries across a range of health and health care indicators, with a focus on Australia’s international performance.

Children’s Headline Indicators 

The Children’s Headline Indicators (CHI) are a set of 19 indicators endorsed by the Australian Health Ministers' Conference, Community and Disability Services Ministers' Conference and the Australian Education, Early Childhood Development and Youth Affairs Senior Officials Committee in 2008 (first reported in 2009). They are high level, measureable indicators that identify the immediate environments as particularly important to children’s health, development and wellbeing. The CHI are presented from 2006 to 2016 and are grouped into 3 broad topic areas—Health, Early learning and care and Family and community.

Patients' out-of-pocket spending on Medicare services 2016–17 

This new report shows variation in the total out-of-pocket costs that patients face in a year for Medicare services delivered outside of the hospital. It shines a spotlight on the costs patients pay for specialist, GP, diagnostic imaging and obstetric services. It also looks at patients’ experience of cost barriers to specialist, GP, imaging and pathology care.

This report was first published on the MyHealthyCommunities website.

MyHealthyCommunities: Coordination of health care – experiences with GP care among patients aged 45 and over 2016 

Shedding light on patient experiences with health care is becoming increasingly important as health systems strive to be more responsive to the needs of the people using their services. This report presents the first findings from the 2016 ABS Survey of Health Care at the Primary Health Network (PHN) area level, as well as variations in the use of and experiences with GP care by sociodemographic groups. It shows that the majority (98%) of patients have a usual GP or place of care and that 80% of patients have both a usual GP and place of care. Nationally, more than 8 in 10 patients (84%) felt that the quality of care they received from their usual GP or others in their usual place of care in the previous 12 months was excellent or very good; this ranged from 71% to 87% across PHN areas.

Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia in Australian hospitals 2016–17  

In 2016–17, Australian public hospitals reported 1,502 cases of hospital-associated Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia (SAB) at a rate of 0.76 cases per 10,000 days of patient care. All states and territories had rates below the national benchmark of 2.0 cases per 10,000 days of patient care. Between 2012–13 and 2015–16, rates of SAB decreased from 0.94 to 0.74 cases per 10,000 days of patient care; this increased to 0.76 in 2016–17.

Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia in Australian public hospitals 2015–16: Australian hospital statistics  

In 2015–16, 1,440 cases of hospital-associated Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia (SAB) were reported in Australian public hospitals. The national rate of SAB in public hospitals was 0.73 cases per 10,000 days of patient care, and all states and territories had rates below the national benchmark of 2.0 cases per 10,000 days of patient care. Between 2011–12 and 2015–16, rates of SAB decreased from 0.96 cases to 0.73 cases per 10,000 days of patient care.

Radiotherapy in Australia: report on the second year of a pilot collection 2014–15 

In this report on the second pilot year collection of national radiotherapy data, data were received from 66 out of 74 service locations across Australia. These services contributed information on over 56,400 courses of radiotherapy delivered in 2014–15. For non-emergency treatment, 50% of patients started treatment within 10 days and 90% started within 28 days. For those who needed emergency treatment, 91% began treatment within the emergency timeframe.

OECD health-care quality indicators for Australia 2015 

This report summarises information Australia provided to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development’s Health at a glance 2015 report, and compares data supplied by Australia in 2015 with data it supplied for previous years and with data reported by other OECD countries. The OECD HCQIs provide a common set of data about the quality of health care delivered across participating OECD member countries.

Stronger Futures in the Northern Territory: Hearing Health Services 2012–2013 

This report presents data on the Indigenous children who participated in the audiology and Child Hearing Health Coordinator (CHHC) programs delivered under the National Partnership Agreement on Stronger Futures in the Northern Territory. During 2012–2013, 1,807 audiology services were provided to 1,541 children. A total of 174 children participated in the CHHC program and presented for 181 visits. Of children who received audiology services, 72% were diagnosed with at least one type of middle ear condition and about 10% had moderate, severe or profound hearing impairment.

Australia's medical indemnity claims 2011-12 

This report presents data on the number, nature and costs of public sector (excluding Western Australia) and private sector medical indemnity claims for 2011-12. There were more new claims and closed claims in the private sector (around 1,750 in both cases) than the public sector (around 1,300 in both cases). Around half of closed claims (54%) were for less than $10,000 compared with 41% that were settled for between $10,000 and $500,000 and 5% that were settled for $500,000 or more.

Australia's medical indemnity claims 2010-11 

Australia's medical indemnity claims 2010-11 looks at the number, nature and costs of public sector (excluding Western Australia) and private sector medical indemnity claims. In 2010-11, there were more new claims in the public than the private sector (1,500 and 1,300 respectively) and similar numbers closed across the sectors (1,400 in the public sector and 1,450 in the private sector). About half of closed claims (53%) were for less than $10,000, compared with 41% settled for between $10,000 and $500,000, and 6% settled for $500,000 or more.

Public and private sector medical indemnity claims in Australia 2009-10 

This report presents information on public and private sector medical indemnity claims for 2009-10. There were 9,415 medical indemnity claims open at some point during the year, including 2,900 new claims. A total of 2,647 claims were closed during the year. The main clinician specialties allegedly involved in the incidents giving rise to claims were General practice and Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

Australia's public sector medical indemnity claims 2009-10 

This report presents data on the number, nature and costs of public sector medical indemnity claims for 2005-06 to 2009-10, with a focus on 2009-10 claims. There were more new claims in 2009-10 (1,620) than in any of the three previous years (about 1,130 to 1,270 claims per year). As in previous years, the three health services most often implicated were Emergency department, General surgery and Obstetrics.

Australia's public sector medical indemnity claims 2008-09 

This report presents data on the number, nature and costs of public sector medical indemnity claims for the period 2004-05 to 2008-09, with a focus on 2008-09 claims. There were fewer new claims in 2008-09 (1,231) than in any of the four previous years (about 1,330 to 2,000 claims per year). As in previous years, the three health service contexts most often implicated were Accident and emergency, Obstetrics and General surgery.

Public and private sector medical indemnity claims in Australia 2008-09 

This report presents information on public and private sector medical indemnity claims for 2008-09. There were 9,173 medical indemnity claims open at some point during the year, including 5,072 from the public sector and 4,101 from the private sector. The main clinician specialties allegedly involved in the incidents giving rise to claims were General practice and Obstetrics and Gynaecology.