Reports

Latest reports

Children’s Headline Indicators 

The Children’s Headline Indicators (CHI) are a set of 19 indicators endorsed by the Australian Health Ministers' Conference, Community and Disability Services Ministers' Conference and the Australian Education, Early Childhood Development and Youth Affairs Senior Officials Committee in 2008 (first reported in 2009). They are high level, measureable indicators that identify the immediate environments as particularly important to children’s health, development and wellbeing. The CHI are presented from 2006 to 2016 and are grouped into 3 broad topic areas—Health, Early learning and care and Family and community.

MyHealthyCommunities: Coordination of health care – experiences with GP care among patients aged 45 and over 2016 

Shedding light on patient experiences with health care is becoming increasingly important as health systems strive to be more responsive to the needs of the people using their services. This report presents the first findings from the 2016 ABS Survey of Health Care at the Primary Health Network (PHN) area level, as well as variations in the use of and experiences with GP care by sociodemographic groups. It shows that the majority (98%) of patients have a usual GP or place of care and that 80% of patients have both a usual GP and place of care. Nationally, more than 8 in 10 patients (84%) felt that the quality of care they received from their usual GP or others in their usual place of care in the previous 12 months was excellent or very good; this ranged from 71% to 87% across PHN areas.

Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia in Australian hospitals 2016–17  

In 2016–17, Australian public hospitals reported 1,502 cases of hospital-associated Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia (SAB) at a rate of 0.76 cases per 10,000 days of patient care. All states and territories had rates below the national benchmark of 2.0 cases per 10,000 days of patient care. Between 2012–13 and 2015–16, rates of SAB decreased from 0.94 to 0.74 cases per 10,000 days of patient care; this increased to 0.76 in 2016–17.

Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia in Australian public hospitals 2015–16: Australian hospital statistics  

In 2015–16, 1,440 cases of hospital-associated Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia (SAB) were reported in Australian public hospitals. The national rate of SAB in public hospitals was 0.73 cases per 10,000 days of patient care, and all states and territories had rates below the national benchmark of 2.0 cases per 10,000 days of patient care. Between 2011–12 and 2015–16, rates of SAB decreased from 0.96 cases to 0.73 cases per 10,000 days of patient care.

Radiotherapy in Australia: report on the second year of a pilot collection 2014–15 

In this report on the second pilot year collection of national radiotherapy data, data were received from 66 out of 74 service locations across Australia. These services contributed information on over 56,400 courses of radiotherapy delivered in 2014–15. For non-emergency treatment, 50% of patients started treatment within 10 days and 90% started within 28 days. For those who needed emergency treatment, 91% began treatment within the emergency timeframe.

OECD health-care quality indicators for Australia 2015 

This report summarises information Australia provided to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development’s Health at a glance 2015 report, and compares data supplied by Australia in 2015 with data it supplied for previous years and with data reported by other OECD countries. The OECD HCQIs provide a common set of data about the quality of health care delivered across participating OECD member countries.

Stronger Futures in the Northern Territory: Hearing Health Services 2012–2013 

This report presents data on the Indigenous children who participated in the audiology and Child Hearing Health Coordinator (CHHC) programs delivered under the National Partnership Agreement on Stronger Futures in the Northern Territory. During 2012–2013, 1,807 audiology services were provided to 1,541 children. A total of 174 children participated in the CHHC program and presented for 181 visits. Of children who received audiology services, 72% were diagnosed with at least one type of middle ear condition and about 10% had moderate, severe or profound hearing impairment.

Australia's medical indemnity claims 2011-12 

This report presents data on the number, nature and costs of public sector (excluding Western Australia) and private sector medical indemnity claims for 2011-12. There were more new claims and closed claims in the private sector (around 1,750 in both cases) than the public sector (around 1,300 in both cases). Around half of closed claims (54%) were for less than $10,000 compared with 41% that were settled for between $10,000 and $500,000 and 5% that were settled for $500,000 or more.

Australia's medical indemnity claims 2010-11 

Australia's medical indemnity claims 2010-11 looks at the number, nature and costs of public sector (excluding Western Australia) and private sector medical indemnity claims. In 2010-11, there were more new claims in the public than the private sector (1,500 and 1,300 respectively) and similar numbers closed across the sectors (1,400 in the public sector and 1,450 in the private sector). About half of closed claims (53%) were for less than $10,000, compared with 41% settled for between $10,000 and $500,000, and 6% settled for $500,000 or more.

Public and private sector medical indemnity claims in Australia 2009-10 

This report presents information on public and private sector medical indemnity claims for 2009-10. There were 9,415 medical indemnity claims open at some point during the year, including 2,900 new claims. A total of 2,647 claims were closed during the year. The main clinician specialties allegedly involved in the incidents giving rise to claims were General practice and Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

Australia's public sector medical indemnity claims 2009-10 

This report presents data on the number, nature and costs of public sector medical indemnity claims for 2005-06 to 2009-10, with a focus on 2009-10 claims. There were more new claims in 2009-10 (1,620) than in any of the three previous years (about 1,130 to 1,270 claims per year). As in previous years, the three health services most often implicated were Emergency department, General surgery and Obstetrics.

Australia's public sector medical indemnity claims 2008-09 

This report presents data on the number, nature and costs of public sector medical indemnity claims for the period 2004-05 to 2008-09, with a focus on 2008-09 claims. There were fewer new claims in 2008-09 (1,231) than in any of the four previous years (about 1,330 to 2,000 claims per year). As in previous years, the three health service contexts most often implicated were Accident and emergency, Obstetrics and General surgery.

Public and private sector medical indemnity claims in Australia 2008-09 

This report presents information on public and private sector medical indemnity claims for 2008-09. There were 9,173 medical indemnity claims open at some point during the year, including 5,072 from the public sector and 4,101 from the private sector. The main clinician specialties allegedly involved in the incidents giving rise to claims were General practice and Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

National outcome measures for early childhood development: development of indicator based reporting framework 

The Council of Australian Governments released the National Early Childhood Development Strategy, Investing in the Early Years in July 2009. The ECD Outcomes Framework in the strategy focuses on what Australia needs to achieve to fulfil the vision that 'by 2020 all children have the best start in life to create a better future for themselves and for the nation'. The early years of a child's life lays the foundation for future health, development, learning and wellbeing. This report outlines the process of developing an indicator-based reporting framework for early childhood development, and establishes a recommended high-level set of indicators to measure progress against the ECD Outcomes Framework in the strategy. It presents the results of a review of existing national and international frameworks related to early childhood development; research evidence on aspects of early childhood development most strongly associated with child health, development and wellbeing outcomes; and outlines the selection process for identifying indicators.

Health and the environment: a compilation of evidence 

There is increasing awareness that our health and the environment in which we live are closely linked. This report compiles evidence on the relationship between health and a selected list of environmental factors including `natural' features (such as temperature and ultraviolet radiation) and aspects of our surroundings which have been created by humans (such as housing and transport). The results of this compilation highlight that: our surroundings can influence our physical health and mental wellbeing through a variety of channels; health and wellbeing may be affected in both positive and negative ways; humans, through their intervention in the environment, can play a vital role in exacerbating or reducing health risks. As the pathways involved can be indirect and complex, this report also examines some of the difficulties involved in assessing the broader relationship between health and the environment.