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Medicare-subsidised GP, allied health and specialist health care across local areas: 2013–14 to 2018–19 

Use of non-hospital Medicare-subsidised services, such as GP, allied health, specialist, diagnostic imaging, and nursing and Aboriginal health workers, continues to vary considerably depending on where a person lives in Australia. In 2018–19, 88% of Australians saw a GP, an increase from 86% in 2013–14. People living in metropolitan Primary Health Network (PHN) areas were more likely to visit their GP after-hours than people from regional areas, whilst the converse was true for the use of GP services targeting chronic disease and complex care coordination and management.

Housing assistance in Australia 2020 

In 2018–19, just under 800,000 Australians lived in social housing, living in over 437,000 dwellings across the country. Over 70% of social housing dwellings were public housing stock with increasing numbers in community housing. Social housing also provided targeted financial assistance for eligible Australians on low incomes and supported people experiencing homelessness or at risk of homelessness.

COVID-19
This release covers data that precedes the COVID-19 period.

Injury expenditure in Australia 2015–16 

Injuries were responsible for the third most health spending of all the burden of disease groups in 2015–16, accounting for an estimated $8.9 billion of health spending. This report provides estimates of health spending on injuries categorised according to both the nature and cause of the injury being treated or managed. Information is presented for total and per person spending by area of expenditure, patient demographics, Indigenous status, state, remoteness area, and the nature and external cause of injury based on the conditions included in the Australian Burden of Disease Study 2015.

Medicare-subsidised GP, allied health and specialist health care across local areas: 2013–14 to 2017–18 

Across Australia, use of non-hospital Medicare-subsidised services, such as GP, allied health, specialist and diagnostic imaging, varies considerably depending on where a patient lives. This variation may reflect differences in patients’ health and health care preferences, population growth and accessibility of services (availability, costs and service options).

Australia's welfare 2019: in brief 

Australia’s welfare 2019: in brief tells the story of welfare in Australia with key findings on housing, education and skills, employment and work, income and finance: government payments, social support, justice and safety, and Indigenous Australians.

Australia’s welfare 2019 is the 14th biennial welfare report of the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. This edition introduces a new format and expanded product suite:

Health expenditure Australia 2016–17 

Health expenditure Australia 2016–17 is available as either data visualisations or a PDF report.

Australia spent $180.7 billion on health in 2016–17—more than $7,400 per person. Real growth in spending of 4.7% in 2016–17 was 1.6 percentage points higher than the average over the past five years (3.1%). Non-government sources recorded the lowest growth rate in health spending in the decade to 2016–17—0.2% compared with the decade average of 4.8%.

Patients' out-of-pocket spending on Medicare services 2016–17 

This new report shows variation in the total out-of-pocket costs that patients face in a year for Medicare services delivered outside of the hospital. It shines a spotlight on the costs patients pay for specialist, GP, diagnostic imaging and obstetric services. It also looks at patients’ experience of cost barriers to specialist, GP, imaging and pathology care.

This report was first published on the MyHealthyCommunities website.

Medicare Benefits Schedule GP and specialist attendances and expenditure in 2016–17 

New data in this web update provides local-level information for 15 measures of health care use across Australia for 2016−17. Results are presented for the 31 Primary Health Network (PHN) areas and smaller local areas called Statistical Areas Level 3 (SA3).

This report was first published on the MyHealthyCommunities website.

Australian health expenditure—demographics and diseases: hospital admitted patient expenditure 2004–05 to 2012–13  

In 2012–13, hospital admitted patient expenditure was estimated at $45.0 billion, and accounted for almost one third (31%) of total health expenditure. Expenditure for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people was estimated at $2.1 billion. Expenditure was highest in older age groups, but grew for all age groups from 2004–05 to 2012–13 (45.5%). Cardiovascular diseases were the largest disease contributor at $5.0 billion (11.1%), followed by injuries at $4.1 billion (9.0%).

Health expenditure Australia 2014–15 

Spending on health in Australia (recurrent and capital expenditure combined) was $161.6 billion in 2014–15, $4.4 billion (2.8%) higher in real terms than in 2013–14. This was the third consecutive year that growth in health expenditure was below the 10-year average (4.6% between 2004–05 and 2014–15). Growth in health expenditure per person was also relatively low, at less than a half of the average annual growth over the decade (1.4% compared with 2.9%). Despite the low growth, the share of the economy (GDP) represented by health reached 10.0% for the first time.

25 years of health expenditure in Australia: 1989–90 to 2013–14 

Health expenditure grew from $50.3 billion in 1989–90 to $154.6 billion in 2013–14 in real terms (adjusted for inflation). Over the period, health expenditure grew much faster than inflation, the population and population ageing. Health expenditure increased from 6.5% of gross domestic product in 1989–90 to 9.7% of gross domestic product in 2013–14.

Health expenditure Australia 2013–14: analysis by sector 

This report extends the analysis presented in Health expenditure Australia 2013–14 to further explore expenditure on particular categories of health goods and services. In 2013–14, $58.8 billion was spent on hospitals in Australia, $54.7 billion on primary health care and $32.0 billion on other health goods and services. A further $9.1 billion was spent on capital expenditure. Unreferred medical services attracted the highest share of primary health care funding in 2013–14, at 19.3%. This is different to earlier in the decade, when benefit-paid pharmaceuticals attracted the most spending from 2008–09 to 2011–12. Growth in expenditure on benefit-paid pharmaceuticals slowed in the last 3 years compared with the rest of the decade. This slower growth in expenditure was in contrast to a steady increase in the number of prescriptions dispensed over the same period.

Health expenditure Australia 2013–14 

Total expenditure on health was estimated at $154.6 billion in 2013–14, up by 3.1% on 2012–13 in real terms. Growth in expenditure per person was $6,639, which was $94 more in real terms than in 2012–13. Despite this relatively slow growth, total expenditure was 9.8% of GDP in 2013–14, up from 9.7% in 2012–13. Governments provided $104.8 billion (or 67.8%) of total health expenditure, which represented about 25% of taxation revenue (unchanged from 2012–13). The non-government sector share of total expenditure increased from 30.0% in 2011–12 to 32.2% in 2013–14, despite generally falling throughout the decade. Funding by individuals was the fastest growing area of non-government sector expenditure over the decade.

Health expenditure Australia 2012–13: analysis by sector 

This report extends the analysis presented in Health expenditure Australia 2012–13 to further explore expenditure on particular categories of health goods and services. In 2012–13, $55.9 billion was spent on hospitals in Australia, $52.9 billion on primary health care and $29.9 billion on other areas of health spending. A further $8.6 billion was spent on capital expenditure. All funders increased their expenditure on hospitals between 2002–03 and 2012–13; however, growth in state and territory government funding ($10.6 billion) was almost double that of the Australian Government ($5.4 billion). Primary health care spending is shared relatively evenly between Australian Government (about 43.0%) and non-government sources (about 41.0%), with the states and territories playing a relatively small role, over the same period.

Health expenditure Australia 2012–13 

Expenditure on health in Australia was estimated to be $147.4 billion in 2012–13, 1.5% higher than in 2011–12 and the lowest growth since the mid 1980’s. In 2012–13, governments provided $100.8 billion (or 68.3%) of total health expenditure. Government funding of health expenditure fell in real terms for the first time in the decade by 0.9%, largely a result of a decline in Australian Government funding of 2.4%. State and territory government funding was also relatively low, growing just 1.4% in real terms in 2012–13. In contrast, growth in non-government funding was relatively strong at 7.2%.