Glossary

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health worker: An Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander with a minimum qualification in the field of primary health care work or clinical practice. This includes Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health practitioners who are one speciality stream of health worker. Health workers liaise with patients, clients and visitors to hospitals and health clinics, and work as a team member to arrange, coordinate and deliver health care in community health clinics.

allied health professional: A health professional who is not a doctor, nurse or dentist. Allied health professionals include (but are not limited to) chiropractors, occupational therapists, optometrists, osteopaths, pharmacists, physiotherapists, podiatrists, psychologists and speech pathologists.

diagnostic imaging: The production of diagnostic images; for example, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, X-rays, ultrasound and nuclear medicine scans.

general practitioner (GP): A medical practitioner who provides primary comprehensive and continuing care to patients and their families in the community.

Medicare: A national, government-funded scheme that subsidises the cost of personal medical services for all Australians and aims to help them afford medical care. The Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS) is the listing of the Medicare services subsidised by the Australian Government. The schedule is part of the wider Medicare Benefits Scheme (Medicare).

midwifery: Antenatal, intrapartum and postnatal care provided by a person who is trained to help women in childbirth.

nurse practitioner: A Registered Nurse with experience, expertise and authority to diagnose and treat people with a variety of acute or chronic health conditions.

primary care: The first point of contact an individual has with the health system and relates to the treatment of non-admitted patients in the community. A subset of primary health care.

primary health care: These are services delivered in many community settings, such as general practices, community health centres, Aboriginal health services and allied health practices (for example, physiotherapy, dietetic and chiropractic practices) and come under numerous funding arrangements.

specialist attendance: A specialist attendance usually requires a referral from a general practitioner. A specialist attendance is a referred patient-doctor encounter (with Medicare funding benefits), such as a visit, consultation and attendance (including a video conference) with a medical practitioner who has been recognised as a specialist or consultant physician for the purposes of Medicare benefits.

telehealth: Health services delivered using information and communication technologies, such as videoconferencing.