Reports

Featured reports

Chronic kidney disease compendium 

The AIHW has developed core monitoring information on the prevalence, incidence, hospitalisation and deaths from CKD (including ESKD) in Australia that is updated on a regular basis on the AIHW website to ensure that the most up-to-date information and trends is easily accessible and available.

Incidence of end-stage kidney disease in Australia 1997–2013 

The incidence of end-stage kidney disease is an important indicator of the health of the Australian population and valuable for health-care planning. End-stage kidney disease usually requires kidney replacement therapy to survive—either dialysis or a kidney transplant—but not all people with ESKD receive these treatments for a variety of reasons. This report builds on an established method for estimating the incidence of end-stage kidney disease and indicates that for every new case treated with dialysis or transplant there is one that is not. The incidence rates of end-stage kidney disease are highest among those aged 75 and over.

Risk factors to health 

Health risk factors are attributes, characteristics or exposures that increase the likelihood of a person developing a disease or health disorder. Behavioural risk factors are those that individuals have the most ability to modify. Biomedical risk factors are bodily states that are often influenced by behavioural risk factors.

Incidence of insulin-treated diabetes in Australia, 2015 

This fact sheet provides the latest available national data on new cases of insulin-treated diabetes in Australia. It shows that in 2015 there were 28,775 people who began using insulin to treat their diabetes in Australia—63% had type 2 diabetes, 26% had gestational diabetes, 9% had type 1 diabetes and 2% had other forms of diabetes or their diabetes status was unknown. The fact sheet is accompanied by a dynamic data display, which provides data on insulin-treated diabetes by age at first insulin use, Indigenous status, remoteness, SEIFA and state/territory.

Diabetes and chronic kidney disease as risks for other diseases: Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011 

This report aims to provide a more comprehensive picture of the full health loss attributable to diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD). It quantifies the impact of diabetes and CKD on the burden of other diseases for which there is evidence of a causal association (‘linked diseases’) to estimate the indirect burden caused by these 2 diseases. It uses disease burden estimates from the Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011 and extends the standard approach for analysis of risk factors to model diabetes and CKD as risk factors. When the indirect burden due to linked diseases was taken into account, the collective burden due to diabetes was 1.9 times as high, and CKD was 2.1 times as high, as their direct burden.

Incidence of insulin-treated diabetes in Australia 2014 

Incidence of insulin-treated diabetes in Australia 2014 presents the latest available national data on new cases of insulin-treated diabetes from the 2014 National (insulin-treated) Diabetes Register. In 2014, nearly 30,000 Australians began using insulin to treat their diabetes—67% had type 2 diabetes, 23% had gestational diabetes, 9% had type 1 diabetes and 2% had other forms of diabetes. Almost 2 in 3 (63%) people diagnosed with type 1 diabetes were aged under 25, whereas almost all (93%) new cases of insulin-treated type 2 diabetes occurred in those aged over 40.

Cardiovascular disease, diabetes and chronic kidney disease—Australian facts: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 

Cardiovascular disease, diabetes and chronic kidney disease—Australian facts is a series of 5 reports by the National Centre for Monitoring Vascular Diseases at the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare that describe the combined burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD). This report on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people presents up-to-date statistics on risk factors, prevalence, hospitalisation and deaths from these 3 chronic diseases. It examines age and sex characteristics and variations by geographical location and compares these with the non-Indigenous population.

Prevalence of type 1 diabetes among children aged 0–14 in Australia 2013 

Prevalence of type 1 diabetes among children aged 0–14 in Australia 2013 presents the first national picture of children aged 0–14 living with type 1 diabetes in Australia. The report, based on data from the National (insulin-treated) Diabetes Register, highlights that in 2013, 6,091 children aged 0–14 had type 1 diabetes in Australia. This represented 139 cases per 100,000 population, or about 1 in 720 Australians aged 0–14. About 2 in 5 children with type 1 diabetes used an insulin pump to administer insulin. The prevalence of type 1 diabetes among children differed by age, state/territory, and residential remoteness areas.