Reports

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National opioid pharmacotherapy statistics annual data (NOPSAD) 2017 

On a snapshot day in 2017, almost 50,000 clients received pharmacotherapy treatment for their opioid dependence at 2,732 dosing points around Australia.

As in previous years, methadone was the most common pharmacotherapy drug, with around two-thirds (60%) of clients treated with this drug.

There were 3,074 prescribers of opioid pharmacotherapy drugs, an increase of 3% from 2016.

Alcohol and other drug treatment services in Australia 2015–16 

In 2015–16, about 796 alcohol and other drug treatment services provided just over 206,600 treatment episodes to an estimated 134,000 clients. The top 4 drugs that led clients to seek treatment were alcohol (32% of treatment episodes), cannabis (23%), amphetamines (23%), and heroin (6%). The proportion of episodes where clients were receiving treatment for amphetamines has continued to rise over the 5 years to 2015–16, from 12% of treatment episodes in 2011–12 to 23% in 2015–16. The median age of clients in AOD treatment services is rising, from 31 in 2006–07 to 33 in 2015–16.

Latest reports

Alcohol and other drug treatment services in Australia 2016–17: key findings 

In 2016–17, 836 publicly-funded alcohol and other drug treatment services provided just over 200,000 treatment episodes to an estimated 127,000 clients.

The top four drugs that led clients to seek treatment were alcohol (32% of all treatment episodes), amphetamines (26%), cannabis (22%) and heroin (5%). The proportion of closed treatment episodes where clients were receiving treatment for amphetamines has more than doubled over the last 10 years, from 11% of treatment episodes in 2007–08 to 27% in 2016–17. Two-thirds (66%) of all clients receiving treatment in 2016–17 were male and the median age of clients remains at 33 years.

AODTS 2016–17 data visualisations 

In 2016–17, 836 publicly-funded alcohol and other drug treatment services provided just over 200,000 treatment episodes to an estimated 127,000 clients.

The top four drugs that led clients to seek treatment were alcohol (32% of all treatment episodes), amphetamines (26%), cannabis (22%) and heroin (5%). The proportion of closed treatment episodes where clients were receiving treatment for amphetamines has more than doubled over the last 10 years, from 11% of treatment episodes in 2007–08 to 27% in 2016–17. Two-thirds (66%) of all clients receiving treatment in 2016–17 were male and the median age of clients remains at 33 years.

Data visualisations of the Alcohol and other drug treatment services in Australia 2016–17: key findings and the associated data cubes (for more detailed data presented in tabular form).

National opioid pharmacotherapy statistics (NOPSAD) 2016 

On a snapshot day in 2016, almost 34,000 clients across 6 jurisdictions received pharmacotherapy treatment for their opioid dependence at 2,011 dosing points. There were 1,472 authorised prescribers of opioid pharmacotherapy drugs.

Data for Victoria and the Australian Capital Territory were unavailable at the time of the initial release on 29 March 2017. Additional supplementary tables were added on 14 November 2017 to include data for these jurisdictions as well as updated Australian totals.

Alcohol and other drug treatment services in Australia 2015–16: key findings 

Over 130,000 Australians received treatment from 796 publicly-funded alcohol and other drug treatment agencies in 2015-16. The principal drugs that led clients to seek treatment were alcohol (32% of treatment episodes), amphetamines (23%), cannabis (23%) and heroin (6%). The alcohol and other drug client group is an ageing cohort with a median age of 33 years in 2015-16, up from 31 years in 2006-07.

Trends in alcohol availability, use and treatment 2003–04 to 2014–15 

From 2003–04 to 2014–15 the rate of treatment for alcohol in Australia has increased. From 2004 to 2013 however, there was a decrease in the rate of Australians drinking alcohol and this was seen across a range of risk measures. Similarly, the apparent consumption of alcohol (as determined through sales and taxation data) has decreased nationally from 2003–04 to 2013–14. Analyses at lower geographical areas found higher rates of people in remote and very remote areas reporting risky drinking than people in other areas—and this was across all measures of risk—and treatment for alcohol was also highest in remote and very remote areas.

Exploring drug treatment and homelessness in Australia: 1 July 2011 to 30 June 2014 

There is much research to suggest a considerable overlap between people experiencing precarious housing, and drug and alcohol misuse. Linking client data from specialist homelessness services and alcohol and other drug treatment services, this report provides a picture of the intersection of these two issues on a national scale. It reveals a vulnerable population, in which Indigenous Australians and experiences of domestic and family violence and mental health issues were all over-represented. Their poorer drug treatment and housing outcomes highlight the level of difficulty faced in assisting these people to achieve long-term outcomes.

Alcohol and other drug treatment services in Australia 2014–15 

In 2014–15, around 850 alcohol and other drug treatment services provided just over 170,000 treatment episodes to around 115,000 clients. The top 4 drugs that led clients to seek treatment were alcohol (38% of treatment episodes), cannabis (24%), amphetamines (20%) and heroin (6%). The proportion of episodes where clients were receiving treatment for amphetamines has continued to increase over the last 10 years, from 11% of treatment episodes in 2005–06 to 20% in 2014–15. The median age of clients in AOD treatment services is increasing, 33 years in 2014–15, up from 31 in 2005–06.

National opioid pharmacotherapy statistics (NOPSAD) 2015 

On a snapshot day in 2015, over 48,000 clients received pharmacotherapy treatment for their opioid dependence at 2,589 dosing points around Australia.

As in previous year, methadone was the most common pharmacotherapy drug, with around two-thirds (66%) of clients treated with this drug. There were 2,556 prescribers of opioid pharmacotherapy drugs, an increase of 9% from 2014.

Trends in methylamphetamine availability, use and treatment, 2003–04 to 2013–14 

There have been several corresponding trends in the availability, use and treatment of methylamphetamines since 2003–04. Following a decline between 2006–07 and 2009–10, there have been increases across many factors relating to methylamphetamines to 2013–14. Arrests, seizures and detections have all increased. Users are now favouring the crystal form of methylamphetamine. They are using it more frequently, and, there appear to be more new users of crystal. There are more people in treatment reporting smoking as their usual method of use for amphetamines than previously.

Alcohol and other drug treatment services in Australia 2013–14 

Around 119,000 clients were estimated to have received over 180,700 treatment episodes from 795 publicly funded alcohol and other drug treatment agencies in 2013-14. Alcohol was the most common drug leading clients aged 30 and over to seek treatment, while cannabis was most common for clients aged 10–29. Over the 5 years from 2009–10, there has been an increase in the proportion of episodes where amphetamines were the principal drug on concern (from 7% to 17%) and an increase in smoking/inhaling as the method of administration for amphetamines. A majority of treatment episodes had a duration of three months or less, and counselling remains the most common treatment type.

National opioid pharmacotherapy statistics 2014 

On a snapshot day in 2014, over 48,000 clients received pharmacotherapy treatment for their opioid dependence at 2,432 dosing points around Australia. As in previous year, methadone was the most common pharmacotherapy drug, with around two-thirds (67%) of clients treated with this drug. There were 2,319 prescribers of opioid pharmacotherapy drugs, an increase of 15% from 2013.

Alcohol and other drug treatment and diversion from the Australian criminal justice system: 2012-13 

Nationally, there were 24,002 clients who had been diverted into alcohol and other drug treatment, comprising 25% of all clients. Diversion clients were younger and more likely to be male than non-diversion clients, and less likely to be Indigenous. Diversion treatment episodes were about twice as likely to involve cannabis as the principal drug of concern compared with episodes for non-diversion clients. Police diversion episodes had less intensive treatment types compared with court diversion episodes.

Alcohol and other drug treatment services in Australia 2012-13 

Over 700 agencies provided over 160,000 treatment episodes for alcohol and other drug issues to an estimated 108,000 clients in Australia in 2012–13. Most episodes were for clients receiving treatment for their own drug use, and these clients tended to be male and in their 20s and 30s. Alcohol was the most common principal drug of concern, accounting for almost half of these closed episodes, and counselling was the most common type of treatment.

National Opioid Pharmacotherapy Statistics 2013 

On a snapshot day in 2013, over 47,000 clients received pharmacotherapy treatment for their opioid dependence at 2,355 dosing points around Australia. As in previous years, methadone was the most common pharmacotherapy drug, with around two-thirds (68%) of clients treated with this drug. There were 2,025 prescribers of opioid pharmacotherapy drugs, an increase of 15% from 2012.

Developing client-based analyses for reporting on alcohol and other drug treatment services 

Developing client based analysis for reporting on alcohol and other drug treatment services outlines AIHW intended analysis techniques to:- estimate the number and rate of clients receiving alcohol and other drug treatment - explore patterns of drug use and pathways through treatment - explore the characteristics of different client groups, for example, those who return to treatment over many years with multiple drugs of concern or treatment types. Some analyses described either require, or would be improved by, future data development activities for this collection. Public consultation is open until 28 February 2014.

Alcohol and other drug treatment services in Australia 2011-12 

Almost 700 agencies provided over 150,000 treatment episodes for alcohol and other drug issues in Australia in 2011-12. Most of the closed episodes provided in 2011-12 were for clients receiving treatment for their own drug use, and these clients tended to be male and in their 20s and 30s. Alcohol was the most common principal drug of concern, accounting for almost half of these closed episodes, and counselling was the most common type of treatment.

National opioid pharmacotherapy statistics annual data (NOPSAD) collection 2012 

On a snapshot day in 2012, almost 47,000 clients received pharmacotherapy treatment for their opioid dependence at 2,226 dosing points around Australia. As in previous years, methadone was the most common pharmacotherapy drug, with around two-thirds (68%) of clients treated with this drug. There were 1,768 prescribers of opioid pharmacotherapy drugs, an increase of 14% from 2011.

Alcohol and other drug treatment services in Australia 2010-11: state and territory findings 

About 700 agencies provide treatment for alcohol and other drug issues in Australia, and three-quarters of these agencies are in New South Wales, Victoria and Queensland. Most of the closed episodes provided in 2010-11 were for clients receiving treatment for their own drug use, and alcohol was the most common principal drug of concern in most states and territories. Counselling was the most common main treatment type in New South Wales, Victoria, Western Australia, South Australia and Tasmania, and was the second most common main treatment in the remaining state and territories.

Alcohol and Other Drug Treatment Services National Minimum Data Set 2012-13: specifications and collection manual 

The Alcohol and Other Drug Treatment Services National Minimum Data Set (AODTS-NMDS) data specifications and collection manual is a reference for those collecting and supplying data for the AODTS-NMDS, including Australian Government and state and territory government staff, and alcohol and other drug treatment agency staff. Major changes to this year's collection include an update to the 'Principal drug of concern' data item to align with the Australian Standard Classification of Drugs of Concern (2011), and the inclusion of additional data elements to enable the number of clients receiving treatment to be estimated.