Reports

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Medical practitioners workforce 2015 

There were over 100,000 medical practitioners registered in Australia in 2015. Of this total, around 88,000 were employed in medicine, working an average of 42 hours per week. Among those employed, 2 in every 5 medical practitioners were women; 1 in every 4 was aged 55 or over.

Nursing and midwifery workforce 2015 

There were over 360,000 nurses and midwives registered in Australia in 2015. Of this total, over 305,000 were employed in nursing or midwifery, working an average of 33.5 hours per week. Among those employed, 9 in every 10 nurses and midwives were women; 2 in every 5 were aged 50 or over.

Spatial distribution of the supply of the clinical health workforce 2014: relationship to the distribution of the Indigenous population 

This report uses a new measure developed by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare—the Geographically-adjusted Index of Relative Supply (GIRS)—to examine the geographic supply of the clinical health workforce in seven key professions with particular relevance to Indigenous Australians. These professions were general practitioners, nurses, midwives, pharmacists, dentists, psychologists and optometrists. Areas with lower GIRS scores are more likely to face workforce supply challenges than those with higher GIRS scores. The GIRS scores were compared with the distribution of the Indigenous population to assess the extent to which Indigenous people live in areas with lower relative levels of workforce supply.

Eye health workforce in Australia 

This report presents the latest available data on the eye health workforce in Australia. It also provides a baseline for reporting against workforce capacity indicators. In 2011, the latest year for which data were available for most professions, there were over 800 ophthalmologists, around 4,000 optometrists and over 6,000 allied ophthalmic personnel (orthoptists, optical dispensers, optical mechanics, orientation and mobility specialists and occupational therapists specialising in eye health) in the eye health workforce.

Medical workforce 2012 

The supply of employed medical practitioners in Australia increased from 323.2 to 355.6 full-time equivalent practitioners per 100,000 population between 2008 and 2012, which reflected a 16.4% rise in employed practitioner numbers. Women made up 37.9% of practitioners in 2012 compared with 34.9% in 2008.

Dental workforce 2012 

The number of dental practitioners registered in Australia in 2012 was 19,462, of whom 14,687 (75.5%) were dentists. The supply of employed dentists increased slightly from 55.4 to 56.9 full-time equivalent practitioners per 100,000 population between 2011 and 2012, which reflected a 5.3% increase in dentists. The gender balance continued to shift, with women making up 36.5% of dentists in 2012 compared with 35.2% in 2011. The average hours worked each week by dentists decreased slightly from 37.3 to 37.0; and those working part time increased from 30.8% to 31.7%.

Nursing and midwifery workforce 2012 

This report outlines the workforce characteristics of nurses and midwives in 2012. Between 2008 and 2012, the number of nurses and midwives employed in nursing or midwifery increased by 7.5%, from 269,909 to 290,144. During this period, nursing and midwifery supply increased by 0.5%, from 1,117.8 to 1,123.6 full-time equivalent nurses and midwives per 100,000 population. In 2012, the proportion of employed nurses and midwives aged 50 or older was 39.1%, an increase from 35.1% in 2008.

Allied health workforce 2012 

This report outlines the workforce characteristics of 11 allied health practitioners for 2011 and 2012. In 2012, more than 4 in 5 registered practitioners were actively employed in their profession (from 76.2% for psychologists to 92.3% for podiatrists). For most professions there were more women than men employed. The average working week for employed practitioners ranged from 31.8 hours for Chinese medicine practitioners to 40.5 hours for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health practitioners.

Dental workforce 2011 

The number of dental practitioners registered in Australia in 2011 was 18,803, of whom 14,179 were dentists. The supply of employed dentists increased from 50.9 to 56.1 full-time equivalent practitioners per 100,000 population between 2006 and 2011, which reflected a 22.4% increase in dentists. The gender balance continued to shift, with women making up 35.6% of dentists in 2011 compared with 29.0% in 2006. The average hours worked each week by dentists decreased slightly from 38.5 to 37.4.

Medical workforce 2011 

The supply of employed medical practitioners in Australia increased from 344.6 to 381.4 full-time equivalent practitioners per 100,000 population between 2007 and 2011, which reflected a 10.7% rise in practitioner numbers. The gender balance continued to shift, with women making up 37.6% of practitioners in 2011 compared with 34% in 2007. Specialists-in-training in the public sector worked the most average hours per week (47.6) while general practitioners in the public sector worked the least (20.5).

Nursing and midwifery labour force 2009 

The supply of nurses increased by 6.2% between 2005 and 2009, from 1,040 full time equivalent (FTE) nurses per 100,000 population to 1,105 FTE nurses based on a 38-hour week. This was mainly a result of both a 13.3% increase in the number of employed nurses, and a 0.9% increase in the average hours they worked over this period. Nursing continued to be a female dominated profession, with females comprising 90.4% of employed nurses in 2009 (down slightly from 92.1% in 2005).