Inadequate dentition prevalence

KPI 5: Proportion of adults aged 18 years and older who have less than 21 natural teeth

Tooth loss can result in an inadequate dentition, that is, fewer than 21 teeth. A person with an inadequate dentition is unlikely to have enough teeth that have a partner tooth on the opposite jaw to be able to chew properly.

In 2017–18, around 1 in 7 (15%) adults aged 18 years and over had fewer than 21 natural teeth, compared to around 1 in 6 (16%) in 2013.  The proportion of adults with fewer than 21 natural teeth increases with age, from 0.7% in 15–24 year olds to 46% in those aged 65 years and over.

Explore the data using the interactive below:

KPI 5 Interactive 1: Proportion of adults aged 18 years and over who have less than 21 natural teeth—Australia

This figure shows the proportion of adults aged 18 years and over who have less than 21 natural teeth. National, state and territory data is presented for 2013 and 2017-18. In Australia, 15% of adults aged 18 years and over had less than 21 natural teeth in 2017-18.

KPI 5 Interactive 2: Proportion of adults aged 18 years and over who have less than 21 natural teeth—Public dental clients

This figure shows the proportion of public dental clients aged 18 years and over who have less than 21 natural teeth, by state and territory, between 2014-15 and 2017-18.

Data tables available for download.

More information about inadequate dentition.